A List Of Vegetables + Nutritional Value With Pictures

A List Of Vegetables

Vegetables are edible plants or parts of plants that are typically consumed as part of a balanced diet. They are rich in essential nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants. Vegetables play a crucial role in maintaining good health and are known for their various health benefits. They come in a wide variety of colors, shapes, and sizes and can be consumed in different ways, including raw, cooked, steamed, grilled, or roasted.

A List Of Vegetables

Artichoke

A list of vegetables

Artichokes are delicious and nutritious vegetables that offer a range of health benefits. They are low in calories and fat while being rich in essential vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber. Here’s a breakdown of the nutrition in a medium-sized (about 128 grams) cooked artichoke:

  • Calories: Approximately 60 calories
  • Carbohydrates: Around 13.5 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: Roughly 6.9 grams (Important for digestive health and can help with weight management)
  • Sugars: About 1.3 grams
  • Protein: Approximately 4.2 grams
  • Fat: Around 0.2 grams (Almost negligible amount)

Vitamins

  • Vitamin C: Approximately 11 milligrams (Contributes to the immune system and skin health)
  • Vitamin K: Around 18 micrograms (Essential for blood clotting and bone health)
  • Folate: About 57 micrograms (Important for cell division and prenatal health)
  • Vitamin B6: Approximately 0.2 milligrams (Plays a role in metabolism and brain development)
  • Niacin: Around 1.3 milligrams (Contributes to energy production and skin health)
  • Riboflavin: Approximately 0.1 milligrams (Important for energy metabolism)
  • Thiamin: About 0.1 milligrams (Plays a role in energy metabolism)
  • Vitamin A: Around 68 micrograms (Contributes to vision and skin health)

Minerals

  • Potassium: Approximately 343 milligrams (Important for heart health and blood pressure regulation)
  • Magnesium: About 60 milligrams (Essential for muscle and nerve function)
  • Phosphorus: Approximately 91 milligrams (Important for bone health and energy production)
  • Calcium: Around 21 milligrams (Contributes to bone health)
  • Iron: Approximately 1.4 milligrams (Essential for oxygen transport in the blood)
  • Zinc: About 0.5 milligrams (Plays a role in immune function and cell division)
  • Copper: Approximately 0.2 milligrams (Contributes to iron metabolism and antioxidant defenses)
  • Manganese: Around 0.3 milligrams (Important for metabolism and antioxidant systems)
  • Selenium: Approximately 0.6 micrograms (Plays a role in antioxidant defense)

Additionally, artichokes contain various bioactive compounds, such as antioxidants and phytonutrients, which can have positive effects on overall health and may help reduce inflammation.

Overall, artichokes are a great addition to a balanced and healthy diet, offering a wide array of nutrients that support various bodily functions.

Asparagus

A List Of Vegetables

Asparagus is a nutrient-rich vegetable that offers a wide range of health benefits. It is a member of the lily family and is known for its distinct flavor and tender spears. Here are some key nutritional components of asparagus:

Vitamins: Asparagus is a good source of various vitamins, including vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin A, and several B vitamins (such as folate, thiamin, riboflavin, and vitamin B6). Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting and bone health, while vitamin C acts as an antioxidant and supports the immune system.

Minerals: Asparagus contains essential minerals, such as potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and calcium. Potassium is important for heart health and maintaining proper fluid balance in the body.

Fiber: Asparagus is a good source of dietary fiber, which aids in digestion, helps maintain bowel regularity, and may contribute to weight management.

Antioxidants: This vegetable is rich in antioxidants, such as flavonoids, polyphenols, and glutathione, which help neutralize harmful free radicals in the body and protect cells from damage.

Prebiotics: Asparagus contains inulin, a type of prebiotic fiber that serves as food for beneficial gut bacteria. Prebiotics help support a healthy gut microbiome, which is essential for overall digestive and immune health.

Low in Calories and Fat: Asparagus is low in calories and virtually fat-free, making it a suitable option for those watching their calorie and fat intake.

Asparagus can be enjoyed in various ways, such as steamed, grilled, roasted, or even raw in salads. It’s a versatile vegetable that can be a great addition to a balanced and nutritious diet.

It’s worth noting that individual nutritional values may vary depending on factors such as cooking method and serving size. If you have specific dietary concerns or health conditions, it’s always a good idea to consult with a registered dietitian or healthcare professional for personalized advice.

Aubergine (eggplant)

A List Of Vegetables

Aubergine, also known as eggplant or brinjal in some regions, is a nutritious vegetable that belongs to the nightshade family. It is widely used in various cuisines around the world and offers a range of health benefits. Here is an overview of aubergine’s nutritional profile:

Low in Calories: Aubergines are low in calories, making them a suitable option for those looking to manage their weight.

Rich in Dietary Fiber: Aubergines are a good source of dietary fiber, which aids in digestion, promotes a feeling of fullness, and helps regulate bowel movements.

Vitamins: Aubergines contain various vitamins, including vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6, and folate. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that supports the immune system, while vitamin K is essential for blood clotting and bone health.

Minerals: Aubergines provide essential minerals such as potassium, manganese, and copper. Potassium is crucial for maintaining healthy blood pressure and proper muscle function.

Antioxidants: Aubergines contain phytonutrients like nasunin, which acts as an antioxidant and may help protect cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Anthocyanins: The purple skin of some varieties of aubergine contains anthocyanins, which not only give it its color but also have potential health benefits, such as reducing the risk of certain chronic diseases.

Low in Carbohydrates: Aubergines are relatively low in carbohydrates, making them suitable for people following low-carb or ketogenic diets.

No Fat or Cholesterol: Aubergines are naturally fat-free and cholesterol-free.

Gluten-Free: Aubergines are naturally gluten-free, making them a great option for individuals with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

When preparing aubergines, keep in mind that they tend to absorb a lot of oil during cooking. To reduce the amount of oil intake, you can try grilling, roasting, or baking them instead of frying.

Remember that while aubergines offer various health benefits, they are just one part of a balanced diet. Incorporating a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins into your meals will provide you with a well-rounded and nutritious diet.

Avocado

Avocado

Avocado is a unique and nutrient-dense fruit that is well-known for its creamy texture and rich flavor. It is often referred to as a superfood due to its impressive nutritional profile. Here’s an overview of avocado nutrition:

Healthy Fats: Avocados are rich in healthy monounsaturated fats, particularly oleic acid. These fats are heart-healthy and can help lower bad cholesterol levels (LDL) while raising good cholesterol levels (HDL).

Fiber: Avocados are an excellent source of dietary fiber, which aids in digestion, promotes satiety, and helps regulate blood sugar levels.

Vitamins: Avocados are a good source of several vitamins, including vitamin K, vitamin E, vitamin C, and various B vitamins (B5, B6, and folate). Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting and bone health, while vitamin E is an antioxidant that helps protect cells from damage.

Minerals: Avocados contain essential minerals such as potassium, magnesium, and copper. Potassium is crucial for maintaining healthy blood pressure and proper muscle function.

Antioxidants: Avocados are rich in antioxidants, such as lutein and zeaxanthin, which are beneficial for eye health. These antioxidants may help reduce the risk of age-related eye conditions.

Protein: While not as protein-rich as animal products, avocados do contain a small amount of protein, which is relatively rare for a fruit.

Low in Sugar: Avocados have very low sugar content compared to other fruits, making them suitable for people aiming to reduce their sugar intake.

Gluten-Free: Like most fruits, avocados are naturally gluten-free, making them a safe option for those with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

Due to its high-fat content, avocados are relatively calorie-dense, but their healthful fats and nutrient content make them an excellent addition to a balanced diet. They can be used in various dishes, including salads, smoothies, spreads, and as a substitute for butter or mayonnaise in certain recipes.

It’s essential to enjoy avocados as part of a well-rounded diet that includes a variety of other fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins to maximize nutritional benefits.

Beet

Beet

Beets, also known as beetroot, are root vegetables known for their deep red or purple color and earthy flavor. They are packed with essential nutrients and offer numerous health benefits. Let’s explore the nutritional value of beets:

Low in Calories: Beets are relatively low in calories, making them a great addition to various diets, including weight management programs.

Rich in Fiber: Beets are an excellent source of dietary fiber, both soluble and insoluble. Fiber aids in digestion, promotes bowel regularity, and helps you feel full and satisfied after meals.

Vitamins: Beets are rich in various vitamins, including vitamin C, vitamin B6, folate (vitamin B9), and vitamin K. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that supports the immune system, while folate is important for cell division and the formation of DNA.

Minerals: Beets contain essential minerals such as potassium, manganese, and iron. Potassium is crucial for maintaining healthy blood pressure and proper muscle function.

Antioxidants: Beets are a rich source of antioxidants, particularly betalains, which give beets their vibrant red color. Betalains have anti-inflammatory and potentially cancer-fighting properties.

Nitrates: Beets are naturally high in nitrates, which can be converted into nitric oxide in the body. Nitric oxide helps relax blood vessels, leading to improved blood flow and potentially lower blood pressure.

Low Glycemic Index: Despite containing natural sugars, beets have a relatively low glycemic index, which means they have a smaller impact on blood sugar levels compared to high-carbohydrate foods.

Detoxifying Properties: Beets contain compounds that support the body’s natural detoxification processes and may help purify the blood and liver.

Natural Pigments: The deep red color of beets comes from betacyanins, another group of pigments that act as antioxidants.

Beets can be enjoyed in various ways, such as raw in salads, roasted, boiled, juiced, or pickled. To retain the maximum nutritional value, it’s best to cook them using gentle methods like steaming or roasting rather than boiling.

As with any food, moderation is key. While beets offer numerous health benefits, it’s essential to consume a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins to ensure a balanced and nutritious diet.

Bok Choy

Bok Choy

Bok choy, also known as Chinese cabbage or pak choi, is a leafy green vegetable commonly used in Asian cuisines. It belongs to the cruciferous vegetable family, which includes broccoli, cauliflower, and kale. Bok choy is not only delicious but also packed with essential nutrients. Here’s an overview of bok choy nutrition:

Low in Calories: Bok choy is very low in calories, making it a great option for those looking to manage their weight.

Vitamins: Bok choy is an excellent source of various vitamins, including vitamin A (as beta-carotene), vitamin C, vitamin K, and vitamin B6. Vitamin A is essential for healthy vision and skin, while vitamin C is an antioxidant that supports the immune system. Vitamin K is important for blood clotting and bone health.

Minerals: Bok choy contains essential minerals such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Potassium is important for maintaining healthy blood pressure and heart function, while calcium and magnesium are vital for strong bones and muscle function.

Fiber: Bok choy is a good source of dietary fiber, which supports digestion, helps maintain a healthy gut, and promotes a feeling of fullness.

Antioxidants: Like other cruciferous vegetables, bok choy contains antioxidants that help protect the body’s cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Choline: Bok choy is a source of choline, an essential nutrient that plays a role in brain function, nerve transmission, and metabolism.

Sulforaphane: Bok choy, like other cruciferous vegetables, contains sulforaphane, a compound with potential anti-cancer properties and other health benefits.

Water Content: Bok choy has a high water content, which helps keep you hydrated and contributes to your daily fluid intake.

Bok choy can be consumed both raw and cooked. It is a versatile vegetable that can be stir-fried, sautéed, steamed, or added to soups and stews. Cooking methods such as steaming or stir-frying can help retain its nutritional value.

As with any vegetable, bok choy is best enjoyed as part of a well-balanced and diverse diet. By incorporating a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins, you can ensure that you’re getting a wide range of nutrients to support overall health and well-being.

Broccoli

Broccoli

Broccoli is a nutritious vegetable that belongs to the Brassicaceae family. It is packed with essential vitamins, minerals, and other beneficial compounds. Here’s a breakdown of its nutrition:

Vitamins

Broccoli is an excellent source of various vitamins, including:

  • Vitamin C: It is abundant in broccoli and acts as an antioxidant, supporting the immune system and promoting healthy skin.
  • Vitamin K: Crucial for blood clotting and bone health.
  • Vitamin A: Important for vision, immune function, and skin health.
  • Vitamin B6: Helps with metabolism and neurological function.
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Essential for cell division and the formation of DNA.

Minerals

Broccoli contains essential minerals such as:

  • Calcium: Important for bone health.
  • Iron: Essential for oxygen transport in the blood.
  • Potassium: Helps maintain proper fluid balance and supports heart health.
  • Fiber: Broccoli is a good source of dietary fiber, aiding digestion and promoting a feeling of fullness.
  • Phytochemicals: Broccoli contains various phytochemicals with potential health benefits, including:
  • Sulforaphane: Known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and it may have potential anticancer effects.
  • Indole-3-carbinol: May help reduce the risk of certain types of cancer.
  • Glucosinolates: These compounds are also associated with cancer prevention.
  • Protein: While not as high in protein as some other vegetables, broccoli does contain a fair amount of plant-based protein.
  • Low in Calories: Broccoli is relatively low in calories, making it a great addition to a balanced diet, especially for those watching their caloric intake.

Incorporating broccoli into your regular diet can contribute to overall health and well-being. It can be enjoyed steamed, boiled, stir-fried, or even raw in salads. To retain its maximum nutritional value, avoid overcooking, as some nutrients may be lost during the cooking process.

Broccolini

Broccolini

Broccolini, also known as baby broccoli or broccolette, is a hybrid vegetable that is a cross between broccoli and Chinese broccoli (gai lan). It has a milder and sweeter flavor compared to traditional broccoli and is known for its tender stems and small florets. In terms of nutrition, broccolini is quite similar to broccoli, but there may be slight differences in their nutrient content.

Here’s a general overview of broccolini’s nutrition:

Vitamins

Like broccoli, broccolini is a good source of various vitamins, including:

  • Vitamin C: An antioxidant that supports the immune system and skin health.
  • Vitamin K: Important for blood clotting and bone health.
  • Vitamin A: Essential for vision, immune function, and skin health.
  • Vitamin B6: Helps with metabolism and neurological function.
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Important for cell division and DNA formation.

Minerals

Broccolini contains essential minerals, such as:

  • Calcium: Important for bone health.
  • Iron: Essential for oxygen transport in the blood.
  • Potassium: Helps maintain proper fluid balance and supports heart health.
  • Fiber: Broccolini is a good source of dietary fiber, which aids in digestion and promotes a feeling of fullness.

Phytochemicals

Broccolini, like broccoli, contains various phytochemicals with potential health benefits, including:

  • Sulforaphane: Known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and it may have potential anticancer effects.
  • Indole-3-carbinol: May help reduce the risk of certain types of cancer.
  • Glucosinolates: Compounds associated with cancer prevention.
  • Protein: Similar to broccoli, broccolini contains some plant-based protein, though the amount may not be significant compared to other protein sources.

Calories: Broccolini is relatively low in calories, making it a nutritious option for those seeking a balanced diet.

The specific nutrient content of broccolini may vary slightly depending on factors such as growing conditions and preparation methods. However, overall, broccolini is a healthy and delicious addition to your diet, providing many essential vitamins, minerals, and other beneficial compounds that contribute to overall health and well-being. As with broccoli, avoid overcooking broccolini to retain its maximum nutritional value. Enjoy it steamed, roasted, sautéed, or even raw in salads.

Broccoli Raab

Broccoli Raab

Broccoli rabe, also known as rapini, is a leafy green vegetable that is closely related to both broccoli and turnips. It has a slightly bitter taste and is commonly used in Italian and Mediterranean cuisines. Here are the approximate nutrition facts for a 1-cup (about 170 grams) serving of cooked broccoli rabe:

  • Calories: 33
  • Carbohydrates: 5.4 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: 3.3 grams
  • Sugars: 0.4 grams
  • Protein: 3.3 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Saturated Fat: 0 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 0 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0 grams
  • Cholesterol: 0 milligrams
  • Sodium: 152 milligrams
  • Potassium: 395 milligrams
  • Vitamin A: 4146 IU (83% of the Daily Value – DV)
  • Vitamin C: 35.3 milligrams (59% of the DV)
  • Calcium: 175 milligrams (18% of the DV)
  • Iron: 2.7 milligrams (15% of the DV)
  • Vitamin K: 102 micrograms (127% of the DV)
  • Folate: 98.7 micrograms (25% of the DV)

Broccoli rabe is a low-calorie vegetable that provides a good amount of dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals. It is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin K, which are important for maintaining healthy vision, supporting the immune system, and promoting proper blood clotting, respectively.

It also contains significant amounts of calcium, iron, and folate, which are essential for bone health, oxygen transport, and cell division. The high vitamin K content in broccoli rabe may interact with blood-thinning medications, so it’s important to consult a healthcare professional if you are taking such medications.

Including broccoli rabe in your diet can be a nutritious addition, providing various health benefits and contributing to a well-balanced and diverse eating plan.

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are a nutritious vegetable belonging to the Brassicaceae family, which also includes broccoli and cabbage. They are small, green, cabbage-like vegetables that grow in bunches along the stalk of the plant. Here are the approximate nutrition facts for a 1-cup (about 88 grams) serving of cooked Brussels sprouts:

  • Calories: 56
  • Carbohydrates: 11 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: 4 grams
  • Sugars: 2.2 grams
  • Protein: 4 grams
  • Fat: 0.4 grams
  • Saturated Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 0.02 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Cholesterol: 0 milligrams
  • Sodium: 23 milligrams
  • Potassium: 342 milligrams
  • Vitamin A: 664 IU (13% of the Daily Value – DV)
  • Vitamin C: 75 milligrams (125% of the DV)
  • Vitamin K: 156 micrograms (195% of the DV)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.2 milligrams (10% of the DV)
  • Folate: 60.8 micrograms (15% of the DV)

Brussels sprouts are low in calories but high in essential nutrients. They are an excellent source of vitamin C, providing more than the daily recommended intake in just one cup. Vitamin C is crucial for a healthy immune system and acts as an antioxidant to protect the body from oxidative stress.

Furthermore, Brussels sprouts are an outstanding source of vitamin K, which plays a vital role in blood clotting and bone health. The vegetable also contains vitamin A, essential for vision and immune function, as well as vitamin B6, which supports various metabolic processes in the body.

Brussels sprouts are rich in dietary fiber, promoting digestive health and helping with regular bowel movements. They also provide minerals like potassium, which is important for maintaining proper fluid balance and heart health.

Including Brussels sprouts in your diet can be a beneficial way to add essential vitamins and minerals to your meals, along with a healthy dose of fiber and antioxidants. They can be prepared in various delicious ways, making them a versatile and nutritious addition to your plate.

Chinese Cabbage

Chinese Cabbage

Chinese cabbage, also known as Napa cabbage or bok choy, is a popular vegetable in Asian cuisine. It is low in calories and rich in essential nutrients, making it a healthy addition to your diet. Here’s an overview of the nutritional content of Chinese cabbage per 100 grams of raw, uncooked leaves:

Calories: Approximately 13-15 calories

Carbohydrates: About 2.2-2.8 grams. Chinese cabbage contains mostly complex carbohydrates and dietary fiber.

Protein: Around 1.1-1.6 grams. While the protein content is relatively low, it still contributes to your overall protein intake.

Fat: Negligible. Chinese cabbage is very low in fat.

Dietary Fiber: Approximately 1.2-1.6 grams. Fiber supports digestive health and can help you feel full and satisfied after a meal.

Vitamins

  • Vitamin C: Chinese cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin C, which is essential for a healthy immune system and skin health.
  • Vitamin K: It contains a good amount of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone health.
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Important for DNA synthesis and cell growth.

Minerals

  • Potassium: Helps maintain healthy blood pressure and heart function.
  • Calcium: Crucial for bone health and muscle function.
  • Iron: Necessary for oxygen transport in the blood.

Chinese cabbage is also a rich source of antioxidants, such as beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin, which play a role in promoting eye health and protecting the body from oxidative stress.

Remember that the nutritional content can vary slightly depending on factors such as the cabbage’s freshness, growing conditions, and preparation methods. Including Chinese cabbage in your diet can contribute to a well-balanced and nutritious eating plan.

Green Cabbage

Green Cabbage

Green cabbage, scientifically known as Brassica oleracea var. capitata, is a popular vegetable that belongs to the cruciferous family. It is well-regarded for its mild flavor, versatility, and numerous health benefits. Here is the approximate nutritional information for one cup (89 grams) of raw, chopped green cabbage:

  • Calories: 22
  • Carbohydrates: 5 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 2 grams
  • Sugars: 2.2 grams
  • Protein: 1 gram
  • Fat: 0 grams
  • Vitamin K: 57% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Vitamin C: 54% DV
  • Vitamin B6: 6% DV
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 5% DV
  • Manganese: 7% DV
  • Calcium: 4% DV
  • Potassium: 4% DV
  • Magnesium: 3% DV
  • Iron: 2% DV

Key Nutritional Highlights:

Vitamin K: Green cabbage is particularly rich in vitamin K, which is essential for blood clotting and bone health.

Vitamin C: It is a great source of vitamin C, an antioxidant that boosts the immune system, aids in collagen production, and enhances iron absorption.

Fiber: The high fiber content contributes to digestive health and helps keep you feeling full and satisfied.

Sulforaphane: Green cabbage contains sulforaphane, a compound known for its potential anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties.

Antioxidants: The various phytonutrients present in cabbage contribute to its antioxidant properties, protecting cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Low-Calorie: Cabbage is low in calories and can be an excellent addition to weight management diets.

Remember that cooking methods can impact the nutrient content of cabbage. Boiling or overcooking cabbage may lead to some nutrient loss. For maximum nutritional benefit, consider eating cabbage raw, lightly steamed, or stir-fried.

As with any specific dietary requirements or health concerns, it’s always a good idea to consult with a registered dietitian or healthcare professional for personalized advice.

Purple Cabbage

Purple Cabbage

Purple cabbage, also known as red cabbage, is a nutritious vegetable that belongs to the Brassica oleracea family. It is similar to green cabbage but has a vibrant purple-red color due to the presence of anthocyanin pigments. Purple cabbage is low in calories and contains various essential nutrients. Here are the approximate nutrition facts for one cup (89 grams) of raw purple cabbage:

  • Calories: 28 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 6 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 2 grams
  • Sugars: 3 grams
  • Protein: 1 gram
  • Fat: 0 grams
  • Vitamin C: 56% of the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI)
  • Vitamin K: 28% of the RDI
  • Vitamin A: 8% of the RDI
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 5% of the RDI
  • Calcium: 4% of the RDI
  • Iron: 4% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 4% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 3% of the RDI

Purple cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin C, an antioxidant that supports the immune system and helps the body absorb iron. It also provides a significant amount of vitamin K, which is essential for blood clotting and bone health. Additionally, the presence of anthocyanins, the pigments responsible for their color, gives purple cabbage powerful antioxidant properties.

The dietary fiber in purple cabbage aids in digestion and promotes a healthy gut. The combination of essential vitamins and minerals makes purple cabbage a valuable addition to a balanced diet, contributing to overall well-being.

Keep in mind that these nutritional values are approximate and can vary based on factors such as the specific variety of cabbage and its growing conditions. Cooking methods can also influence nutrient content. In general, it’s best to consume a variety of colorful vegetables to ensure you receive a wide range of nutrients and health benefits.

Savoy Cabbage

Savoy Cabbage

Savoy cabbage is a type of cabbage that is known for its crinkled leaves and mild, slightly sweet flavor. Like other members of the Brassica oleracea family, savoy cabbage is packed with essential nutrients and is a healthy addition to your diet. Here are the approximate nutrition facts for one cup (90 grams) of raw savoy cabbage:

  • Calories: 19 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 4 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 2 grams
  • Sugars: 2 grams
  • Protein: 1 gram
  • Fat: 0 grams
  • Vitamin C: 34% of the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI)
  • Vitamin K: 219% of the RDI
  • Vitamin A: 85% of the RDI
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 10% of the RDI
  • Calcium: 4% of the RDI
  • Iron: 3% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 4% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 2% of the RDI

As you can see, savoy cabbage is a good source of vitamins and minerals. It is particularly rich in vitamin K, which is essential for blood clotting and bone health. Vitamin C is also present in significant amounts, supporting the immune system and acting as an antioxidant.

The high vitamin A content in savoy cabbage is due to its beta-carotene content, which is converted into vitamin A in the body. Vitamin A is important for vision, skin health, and immune function.

Savoy cabbage is low in calories and carbohydrates, making it a suitable option for those looking to manage their calorie intake or maintain stable blood sugar levels. Additionally, the dietary fiber in savoy cabbage supports digestive health and can contribute to a feeling of fullness.

As with any vegetable, the nutritional content can vary slightly depending on factors such as growing conditions and freshness. However, including savoy cabbage in your diet provides a variety of health benefits due to its nutrient-rich profile.

Carrots

Carrots

Carrots are a popular root vegetable known for their vibrant orange color and sweet flavor. They are rich in essential nutrients and provide numerous health benefits. Here are the approximate nutrition facts for one medium-sized raw carrot (about 61 grams):

  • Calories: 25 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 6 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 2 grams
  • Sugars: 3 grams
  • Protein: 1 gram
  • Fat: 0 grams
  • Vitamin A: 509% of the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI)
  • Vitamin K: 6% of the RDI
  • Vitamin C: 6% of the RDI
  • Vitamin B6: 5% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 3% of the RDI

Carrots are particularly well-known for their incredibly high vitamin A content, which is mainly in the form of beta-carotene, giving carrots their orange color. Vitamin A is essential for maintaining healthy vision, supporting the immune system, and promoting skin health.

Additionally, carrots contain dietary fiber, which aids in digestion and helps maintain bowel regularity. They are also a source of vitamins C and K, both of which play important roles in overall health. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that boosts the immune system and supports skin health, while vitamin K is important for blood clotting and bone health.

Carrots are relatively low in calories and have a low glycemic index, making them suitable for various diets, including weight management and diabetes-friendly diets.

Apart from the nutrients mentioned above, carrots also contain small amounts of other vitamins and minerals like vitamin E, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, and potassium.

Keep in mind that these values are approximate and can vary based on the size and variety of the carrot. Cooking methods can also impact the nutrient content, with raw carrots preserving more nutrients than cooked ones.

Incorporating carrots into your regular diet is a delicious and nutritious way to support your overall health and well-being. They can be enjoyed raw as a snack, added to salads, or used in various cooked dishes, such as soups, stews, and stir-fries.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a highly nutritious vegetable that belongs to the Brassicaceae family, which also includes broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts. It is low in calories and carbohydrates, making it a popular choice for those following a low-carb or keto diet. Here’s a breakdown of the nutrition of cauliflower per 100 grams of raw cauliflower:

  • Calories: Approximately 25 calories
  • Carbohydrates: About 5 grams, with 2 grams of dietary fiber and 2 grams of sugar.
  • Protein: Around 2 grams
  • Fat: Less than 0.5 grams
  • Vitamins: Cauliflower is an excellent source of various vitamins, including vitamin C (about 48 mg per 100 grams), vitamin K, vitamin B6, folate, and pantothenic acid.
  • Minerals: It contains minerals such as potassium, manganese, magnesium, and phosphorus.

Cauliflower is also packed with antioxidants, which help to neutralize harmful free radicals in the body and protect against chronic diseases. The presence of sulforaphane, a sulfur-containing compound found in cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower, has been linked to potential anti-cancer properties.

Moreover, cauliflower can be a good alternative to grains in certain dishes, making it a versatile ingredient for those with dietary restrictions or preferences.

Keep in mind that the nutritional content may vary slightly depending on the cooking method. Boiling or steaming cauliflower might cause some loss of water-soluble vitamins, so consuming it raw or lightly cooked is often recommended to retain the maximum nutritional benefits.

Celeriac

Celeriac

Celeriac, also known as celery root, is a root vegetable that is related to celery but is grown for its bulbous root rather than its stalks. It has a distinctive flavor that is a combination of celery and parsley. Celeriac is low in calories and a good source of various essential nutrients. Here’s the nutritional breakdown of celeriac per 100 grams of raw celeriac:

  • Calories: Approximately 42 calories
  • Carbohydrates: About 9 grams, with 1.8 grams of dietary fiber and 1.4 grams of sugar.
  • Protein: Around 1.5 grams
  • Fat: Less than 0.2 grams
  • Vitamins: Celeriac is an excellent source of vitamin K, providing about 41 micrograms per 100 grams. It is also a good source of vitamin C and some B vitamins, such as vitamin B6 and folate.
  • Minerals: Celeriac contains various minerals, including potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium.

Celeriac is a particularly good source of vitamin K, which plays a vital role in blood clotting and bone health. It also provides vitamin C, an antioxidant that supports the immune system and helps protect cells from damage.

Due to its lower carbohydrate content compared to some other root vegetables, celeriac is a good option for those on low-carb or ketogenic diets. It can be used as a lower-calorie and lower-carb alternative to potatoes in many dishes.

When cooking celeriac, it is often peeled and can be boiled, mashed, roasted, or used in soups and stews. Its unique flavor and versatility make it a valuable addition to various culinary creations while providing essential nutrients.

Celery

Celery

Celery is a popular and crunchy vegetable known for its low-calorie content and high water content. It is often consumed raw as a snack or added to salads, soups, and various dishes for its refreshing and mildly tangy flavor. Here’s the nutritional breakdown of celery per 100 grams of raw celery:

  • Calories: Approximately 16 calories
  • Carbohydrates: About 3.4 grams, with 1.6 grams of dietary fiber and 1.8 grams of sugar.
  • Protein: Around 0.7 grams
  • Fat: Approximately 0.2 grams
  • Vitamins: Celery is a good source of vitamin K, providing about 29 micrograms per 100 grams. It also contains some vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, and folate.
  • Minerals: Celery contains various minerals, including potassium, magnesium, and calcium.

The high water and fiber content in celery makes it a hydrating and low-calorie snack option. The dietary fiber helps with digestion and can contribute to a feeling of fullness, which may aid in weight management.

Celery is also known for its potential health benefits, such as its antioxidant properties and anti-inflammatory effects. Some compounds in celery, like apigenin and luteolin, have been studied for their potential anti-cancer properties.

In addition to being consumed raw, celery can be cooked, sautéed, or used as a flavor base in soups and stews. Its leaves and seeds are also utilized in certain culinary applications and herbal remedies.

Overall, celery is a nutritious vegetable that can be easily incorporated into a balanced diet, adding both flavor and health benefits to your meals.

Chard (Red and Swiss)

Chard (Red and Swiss)

Chard, also known as Swiss chard, is a leafy green vegetable that comes in different varieties, including red chard and green or white-stemmed Swiss chard. Both types are highly nutritious and offer an array of health benefits. Here’s the nutritional breakdown of chard per 100 grams of raw chard:

  • Calories: Approximately 19 calories
  • Carbohydrates: About 3.7 grams, with 1.6 grams of dietary fiber and 1.1 grams of sugar.
  • Protein: Around 1.8 grams
  • Fat: Approximately 0.2 grams
  • Vitamins: Chard is an excellent source of vitamin K, providing about 830 micrograms per 100 grams. It is also rich in vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, and some B vitamins, such as vitamin B6 and folate.
  • Minerals: Chard contains various essential minerals, including potassium, magnesium, iron, and calcium.

Chard is particularly known for its exceptionally high vitamin K content, which is crucial for blood clotting and bone health. Additionally, the significant presence of vitamins A and C provides antioxidant benefits, supporting the immune system and protecting the body against harmful free radicals.

The dietary fiber in chard aids in digestion and promotes a feeling of fullness, making it a great addition to a balanced diet, especially for those trying to manage their weight.

Both the green leaves and the colorful stems of chard are edible and can be prepared in various ways. Chard can be sautéed, steamed, added to soups, used in stir-fries, or eaten raw in salads.

Including chard in your diet is an excellent way to enjoy a wide range of nutrients and health benefits, contributing to overall well-being and a diverse culinary experience.

Chicory

Chicory

Chicory (Cichorium intybus) is a leafy green vegetable that belongs to the dandelion family. It is popular for its bitter flavor and is often used in salads or as a cooked vegetable. The root of the chicory plant is also roasted and ground to make a coffee substitute.

Here is the approximate nutritional information for 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of raw chicory:

  • Calories: 23 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 4.7 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 4 grams
  • Sugars: 0.7 grams
  • Protein: 1.3 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams
  • Saturated fat: 0.1 grams
  • Cholesterol: 0 milligrams
  • Sodium: 22 milligrams
  • Potassium: 420 milligrams
  • Vitamin A: 2,611 IU (International Units)
  • Vitamin C: 8 milligrams
  • Vitamin K: 344 micrograms
  • Calcium: 30 milligrams
  • Iron: 0.6 milligrams
  • Magnesium: 15 milligrams

Chicory is particularly rich in vitamins A and K, providing essential nutrients that support eye health and blood clotting. It is also a good source of dietary fiber, which aids in digestion and promotes a healthy gut. Additionally, chicory contains minerals like potassium, calcium, and magnesium, which play essential roles in maintaining proper heart function, bone health, and nerve function.

Furthermore, chicory contains inulin, a type of soluble fiber that acts as a prebiotic. Prebiotics serve as food for beneficial gut bacteria, promoting a healthy gut microbiome.

Overall, chicory is a nutrient-dense and low-calorie vegetable, making it a valuable addition to a balanced and healthy diet. However, the actual nutrient content may vary slightly depending on factors like growing conditions and preparation methods.

Corn

Corn

Corn, also known as maize, is a popular cereal grain that has been a staple food for many cultures around the world. It is not only delicious but also offers various nutritional benefits. Below is the approximate nutritional information for one cup (166 grams) of cooked corn:

  • Calories: 177 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 41 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 4.6 grams
  • Sugars: 5.9 grams
  • Protein: 5.4 grams
  • Fat: 2.1 grams
  • Saturated fat: 0.3 grams
  • Monounsaturated fat: 0.59 grams
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 0.86 grams
  • Trans fat: 0 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A: 416 IU (8% of the Daily Value, DV)
  • Vitamin C: 6.1 mg (10% DV)
  • Vitamin E: 0.23 mg (1% DV)
  • Vitamin K: 0.3 mcg (0% DV)
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): 0.31 mg (21% DV)
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): 2.86 mg (14% DV)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.22 mg (11% DV)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 34.5 mcg (9% DV)
  • Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5): 1.25 mg (12% DV)

Minerals

  • Potassium: 416 mg (12% DV)
  • Magnesium: 37.9 mg (9% DV)
  • Phosphorus: 143 mg (14% DV)
  • Iron: 1.54 mg (9% DV)
  • Zinc: 0.96 mg (6% DV)
  • Copper: 0.14 mg (7% DV)
  • Manganese: 0.39 mg (19% DV)
  • Selenium: 8.3 mcg (12% DV)

Corn is a good source of complex carbohydrates and dietary fiber, which can help with digestion and provide a feeling of fullness. It also contains a decent amount of protein and various essential vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin B1 (thiamin), vitamin B3 (niacin), and manganese.

Corn is low in fat, but the fat it contains is primarily unsaturated, which is considered heart-healthy. Additionally, it is a good source of antioxidants, such as zeaxanthin and lutein, which are beneficial for eye health.

It’s important to note that the nutritional content of corn can vary slightly depending on the variety and how it’s prepared. For instance, cooking methods and added toppings or seasonings can impact the final nutritional profile.

Overall, corn can be a valuable part of a balanced diet, offering a mix of nutrients that contribute to overall health and well-being. However, like any food, it’s best enjoyed in moderation as part of a varied and diverse diet.

Cress

Cress

“Cress” usually refers to watercress (Nasturtium officinale), a leafy green vegetable that is often used in salads, sandwiches, and as a garnish. Watercress is highly nutritious and offers various health benefits due to its rich array of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here are some of its nutritional highlights:

Vitamins: Watercress is an excellent source of vitamin K, providing more than 100% of the recommended daily intake in just a small serving. It also contains significant amounts of vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B6, vitamin E, and various B vitamins.

Minerals: Watercress is rich in essential minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus.

Antioxidants: Watercress contains potent antioxidants like beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and quercetin, which help protect the body’s cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Phytonutrients: It is a good source of phytonutrients, such as isothiocyanates, which have been linked to potential cancer-fighting properties.

Low Calories: Watercress is incredibly low in calories, making it a great option for those trying to manage their weight.

Hydration: As its name suggests, watercress has a high water content, contributing to hydration.

Consuming watercress as part of a balanced diet can be beneficial for overall health and well-being. However, it’s important to remember that a diverse and varied diet is key to obtaining all the necessary nutrients for optimal health. If you have specific dietary concerns or health conditions, it’s always best to consult with a registered dietitian or healthcare professional who can provide personalized advice.

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Cucumbers are a popular vegetable known for their refreshing taste and high water content. They are low in calories and provide various essential nutrients. Here’s a breakdown of cucumber nutrition per 100 grams of raw cucumber:

  • Calories: Approximately 15 calories
  • Carbohydrates: About 3.63 grams, including dietary fiber (around 0.5 grams) and sugars (approximately 1.67 grams)
  • Protein: Roughly 0.65 grams
  • Fat: Very low, around 0.11 grams
  • Vitamins: Cucumbers are a good source of vitamin K, vitamin C, and some B vitamins (like B5, B1, and B7).
  • Minerals: They contain minerals such as potassium, magnesium, and manganese.

Cucumbers are mainly composed of water, making them an excellent choice for staying hydrated. They also provide a small amount of antioxidants, including beta-carotene and flavonoids, which contribute to their potential health benefits.

Daikon

Daikon

Daikon, also known as white radish or mooli, is a type of radish with a mild flavor commonly used in Asian cuisine. Like other radishes, daikon is a low-calorie vegetable that offers various essential nutrients. Here’s a breakdown of daikon nutrition per 100 grams of raw daikon:

  • Calories: Approximately 18 calories
  • Carbohydrates: About 4.1 grams, including dietary fiber (around 1.6 grams) and sugars (approximately 2.5 grams)
  • Protein: Roughly 0.6 grams
  • Fat: Very low, around 0.1 grams
  • Vitamins: Daikon is a good source of vitamin C, providing a significant portion of the recommended daily intake. It also contains small amounts of vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin K.
  • Minerals: Daikon is rich in potassium, and it also contains calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus.

Garlic

Garlic (Allium sativum) is a popular culinary ingredient known for its strong flavor and aroma. It also offers numerous health benefits and has been used for medicinal purposes for centuries. Here is an overview of garlic’s nutritional profile:

Macronutrients: Garlic is low in calories and contains carbohydrates, proteins, and a small amount of fat.

Vitamins: Garlic is a good source of several vitamins, including vitamin C, vitamin B6, and a variety of B-vitamins like thiamine (B1) and pantothenic acid (B5).

Minerals: Garlic contains essential minerals, such as manganese, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium. It also contains trace amounts of iron, zinc, magnesium, and selenium.

Fiber: Garlic provides dietary fiber, which is essential for digestive health.

Active Compounds: Garlic contains a variety of bioactive compounds, including allicin, alliin, ajoene, and diallyl disulfide, which are responsible for its strong odor and numerous health benefits.

Green Beans

Green Beans

Green beans, also known as snap beans or string beans, are a popular vegetable with a crisp texture and mild, slightly sweet flavor. They are commonly eaten cooked but can also be consumed raw. Here’s an overview of the nutritional profile of green beans per 100 grams:

Calories: Approximately 31 calories

Carbohydrates: About 7 grams of carbohydrates, including dietary fiber. The fiber content helps support digestive health and can contribute to a feeling of fullness.

Protein: Around 1.8 grams of protein. While not a significant source of protein, green beans can still contribute to your overall protein intake.

Fat: Green beans are very low in fat, with less than 0.2 grams per 100 grams.

Vitamins: Green beans are rich in various vitamins, including vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin A, and several B vitamins like thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), and vitamin B6.

Minerals: Green beans are a good source of minerals such as potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, and iron.

Antioxidants: Green beans contain various antioxidants, such as carotenoids (including beta-carotene), flavonoids, and catechins, which help protect the body’s cells from oxidative damage.

The nutritional content of green beans can vary slightly depending on the cooking method and whether they are fresh, frozen, or canned. Cooking green beans can slightly reduce their vitamin C content, but other nutrients remain relatively stable.

Green beans are a nutritious addition to a balanced diet and can be enjoyed in a variety of ways, including steamed, sautéed, roasted, or added to salads, soups, and stir-fries. They are a good source of vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber, making them a beneficial choice for overall health and well-being.

Greens

Greens

“Greens” is a broad term that typically refers to leafy green vegetables, which are highly nutritious and an essential part of a healthy diet. Here is a general overview of the nutrition found in various types of leafy greens:

Calories: Leafy greens are generally low in calories, making them a great choice for those looking to manage their weight.

Carbohydrates: Leafy greens are typically low in carbohydrates, making them suitable for low-carb and keto diets. They provide mostly fiber and complex carbohydrates.

Fiber: Greens are an excellent source of dietary fiber, which is essential for digestive health and can help you feel full and satisfied.

Vitamins: Leafy greens are rich in various vitamins, including vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, and several B vitamins such as folate (B9), riboflavin (B2), and vitamin B6.

Minerals: Greens are a good source of important minerals like potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, and manganese.

Antioxidants: Leafy greens are packed with antioxidants, including beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and flavonoids, which help protect the body from oxidative stress and support overall health.

Collard Greens

Collard Greens

Collard greens are a highly nutritious leafy green vegetable that belongs to the Brassica family, which also includes broccoli, cabbage, and kale. They are commonly cultivated in various parts of the world and are particularly popular in Southern cuisine. Here is the approximate nutrition profile for one cup (190 grams) of cooked collard greens:

  • Calories: 49
  • Carbohydrates: 9 grams
  • Fiber: 7.6 grams
  • Protein: 4 grams
  • Fat: 0.5 grams
  • Vitamin A: 5,328 IU (over 100% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin C: 35 mg (over 50% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin K: 836 mcg (over 1000% of the Daily Value)
  • Folate: 177 mcg (over 40% of the Daily Value)
  • Calcium: 266 mg (over 25% of the Daily Value)
  • Potassium: 290 mg (around 8% of the Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: 31 mg (around 8% of the Daily Value)

Collard greens are an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and K, as well as various minerals, making them highly nutritious and beneficial for overall health. The high fiber content is good for digestion, and the rich assortment of vitamins and minerals helps support various bodily functions and boosts the immune system.

When cooking collard greens, it’s essential to avoid overcooking them to preserve their nutritional value. Boiling them briefly or steaming them are good cooking methods that help retain the nutrients. Additionally, collard greens can be a part of a balanced diet to promote overall well-being.

Mustard Greens

Mustard Greens

Mustard greens, like collard greens, are a nutrient-rich leafy green vegetable that is part of the Brassica family. They have a slightly peppery and pungent flavor and are commonly used in various cuisines around the world. Here is the approximate nutrition profile for one cup (56 grams) of cooked mustard greens:

  • Calories: 21
  • Carbohydrates: 3 grams
  • Fiber: 2.2 grams
  • Protein: 2.3 grams
  • Fat: 0.4 grams
  • Vitamin A: 5,554 IU (over 100% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin C: 17 mg (over 20% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin K: 278 mcg (over 300% of the Daily Value)
  • Folate: 34 mcg (around 8% of the Daily Value)
  • Calcium: 64 mg (around 6% of the Daily Value)
  • Potassium: 186 mg (around 4% of the Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: 13 mg (around 4% of the Daily Value)

Like collard greens, mustard greens are rich in vitamins A, C, and K, which are essential for various bodily functions, including immune support, bone health, and skin health. They are also a good source of folate, which is important for cell division and the synthesis of DNA. The calcium content in mustard greens contributes to bone health, while potassium helps in maintaining proper heart and muscle function.

Additionally, mustard greens contain various phytonutrients, including glucosinolates, which are associated with potential health benefits such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

To prepare mustard greens, they can be lightly cooked, sautéed, or added raw to salads, depending on your preference. As with any vegetable, cooking them lightly helps preserve their nutritional value. Including mustard greens in your diet can be a great way to enhance your overall nutrient intake and promote a healthy lifestyle.

Gourds

Gourds

“Gourd” is a term that encompasses several types of fruits from the Cucurbitaceae family. Some common gourd varieties include bottle gourd, bitter gourd (bitter melon), sponge gourd, and ridge gourd. These gourds are widely consumed in various parts of the world and are known for their nutritional benefits. Here is a general overview of the nutrition profile of gourds:

Nutrition values per 100 grams of raw gourd (values can vary depending on the specific type of gourd):

  • Calories: 15-20 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 3-4 grams
  • Fiber: 0.5-1.5 grams
  • Protein: 0.5-1.5 grams
  • Fat: 0.1-0.2 grams
  • Vitamin C: 10-30 mg (about 15-50% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin A: 5-30 IU (about 1-6% of the Daily Value)
  • Potassium: 100-200 mg (about 2-4% of the Daily Value)

Gourds are relatively low in calories and carbohydrates, making them suitable for various diets. They are also a good source of dietary fiber, which aids in digestion and helps maintain a healthy digestive system.

The vitamin C content in gourds contributes to their antioxidant properties, supporting the immune system and protecting cells from oxidative stress. Vitamin A is essential for eye health and overall immune function.

Potassium is an essential mineral that plays a vital role in maintaining proper heart function, muscle contractions, and nerve transmission.

It’s worth noting that the nutrient content of specific gourd types can vary, so it’s always a good idea to check the nutritional information for the particular type of gourd you are consuming.

Gourds are versatile vegetables that can be cooked in various ways, including sautéing, stir-frying, boiling, or baking. They are a popular ingredient in many traditional dishes and can be a valuable addition to a balanced and nutritious diet.

Jicama

Jicama

Jicama (pronounced “hee-ka-ma”) is a root vegetable that originates from Mexico. It is also known as the Mexican yam bean or Mexican turnip. Jicama is renowned for its crisp, juicy texture and slightly sweet flavor, making it a popular addition to salads, salsas, and other dishes. From a nutritional standpoint, jicama offers several health benefits as it is low in calories and rich in essential nutrients.

Here is the approximate nutritional profile of 100 grams (about 3.5 ounces) of raw jicama:

  • Calories: 38 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 8.8 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 4.9 grams
  • Sugars: 1.8 grams
  • Protein: 0.7 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Vitamin C: 20.2 milligrams (about 34% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Potassium: 150 milligrams (about 4% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Folate: 12 micrograms (about 3% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Magnesium: 12 milligrams (about 3% of the recommended daily intake)

Kale

Kale

Kale is a leafy green vegetable that belongs to the Brassica family, which also includes cabbage, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. It is widely recognized as a nutritional powerhouse due to its abundance of vitamins, minerals, and various beneficial compounds. Here is an overview of kale’s nutrition:

Vitamins

Kale is rich in several vitamins, including:

  • Vitamin A: Important for vision, immune function, and skin health.
  • Vitamin C: An antioxidant that supports the immune system and collagen production.
  • Vitamin K: Essential for blood clotting and bone health.
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Essential for cell division and DNA synthesis.
  • Vitamin B6: Necessary for metabolism and brain development.

Minerals

Kale contains a variety of minerals, such as:

  • Calcium: Crucial for bone health and muscle function.
  • Magnesium: Involved in over 300 biochemical reactions in the body.
  • Potassium: Important for heart health and maintaining fluid balance.
  • Iron: Necessary for oxygen transport in the blood.
  • Antioxidants: Kale is loaded with powerful antioxidants, including:

Beta-carotene: A precursor to vitamin A, offering protection against oxidative stress.

Flavonoids: Such as quercetin and kaempferol, which have anti-inflammatory properties.

Polyphenols: Protective compounds that contribute to overall health.

Fiber: Kale is an excellent source of dietary fiber, which aids in digestion and promotes gut health.

Protein: Though not as high as in animal products or legumes, kale contains a good amount of protein, making it a valuable addition to a plant-based diet.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Kale provides a small amount of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an essential omega-3 fatty acid that supports heart health.

Overall, kale is a nutrient-dense vegetable that can be an excellent addition to a balanced and healthy diet. It is versatile and can be prepared in various ways, such as sautéed, steamed, roasted, or blended into smoothies. However, as with any food, it’s best to consume a diverse range of fruits and vegetables to ensure you get a wide array of nutrients and benefits.

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi, scientifically known as Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes, is a vegetable that belongs to the Brassicaceae family, which includes other cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage. It is commonly found in various cuisines and is known for its unique appearance, resembling a cross between a turnip and a cabbage. Both the bulb and the leaves of kohlrabi are edible and offer various nutritional benefits.

Here is the approximate nutritional content of 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of raw kohlrabi:

  • Calories: 27 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 6.2 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 3.6 grams
  • Sugars: 2.6 grams
  • Protein: 1.7 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Vitamin C: 62 mg (about 102% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.2 mg (about 11% of the Daily Value)
  • Potassium: 350 mg (about 10% of the Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: 19 mg (about 5% of the Daily Value)
  • Phosphorus: 46 mg (about 5% of the Daily Value)
  • Calcium: 24 mg (about 2% of the Daily Value)
  • Iron: 0.4 mg (about 2% of the Daily Value)

Kohlrabi is a low-calorie vegetable, making it suitable for people watching their calorie intake. It is an excellent source of vitamin C, an antioxidant that supports the immune system, and skin health, and aids in the absorption of iron from plant-based sources. The vegetable also contains small amounts of vitamin B6, which is essential for metabolism and brain health, as well as minerals like potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium, and iron, all of which play vital roles in maintaining various bodily functions.

Furthermore, kohlrabi is rich in dietary fiber, which is beneficial for digestive health and can help regulate bowel movements. The fiber content can also contribute to a feeling of fullness, potentially aiding in weight management.

Overall, kohlrabi is a nutritious and versatile vegetable that can be enjoyed raw in salads, roasted, stir-fried, or used in various other culinary applications. Including kohlrabi in your diet can be a great way to boost your nutrient intake and add variety to your meals.

Leeks

Leeks

Leeks (Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum) are a vegetable belonging to the Allium family, which also includes onions, garlic, and shallots. They have a mild onion-like flavor and are commonly used in various cuisines around the world. Leeks are packed with essential nutrients and can be a great addition to a healthy diet. Here is the approximate nutritional profile of leeks per 100 grams of raw leeks:

  • Calories: 61 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 14.2 g
  • Dietary fiber: 1.8 g
  • Sugars: 3.9 g
  • Protein: 1.5 g
  • Fat: 0.3 g
  • Saturated fat: 0.07 g
  • Monounsaturated fat: 0.04 g
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 0.14 g

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A: 1668 IU (33% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Vitamin C: 12 mg (20% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Vitamin K: 47 µg (59% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 64 µg (16% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.2 mg (10% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): 0.9 mg (5% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): 0.03 mg (2% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): 0.06 mg (4% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5): 0.2 mg (2% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Vitamin E: 0.92 mg (5% of the Daily Recommended Intake)

Minerals

  • Potassium: 180 mg (5% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Phosphorus: 35 mg (4% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Calcium: 59 mg (6% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Magnesium: 28 mg (7% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Iron: 2.1 mg (12% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Zinc: 0.4 mg (3% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Copper: 0.1 mg (5% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Manganese: 0.2 mg (9% of the Daily Recommended Intake)
  • Selenium: 0.9 µg (1% of the Daily Recommended Intake)

Leeks are low in calories and fat but are rich in vitamins and minerals, particularly vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, and folate. Vitamin A is essential for vision and skin health, vitamin C is an antioxidant that supports the immune system, and vitamin K is important for blood clotting and bone health. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and cell division, making it particularly important during pregnancy.

Leeks also contain various minerals like potassium, which is crucial for heart health, and iron, which is vital for oxygen transport in the blood and energy production. Additionally, they provide dietary fiber, which supports digestive health.

Incorporating leeks into your diet can be a nutritious way to enhance your meals and gain these health benefits.

Arugula Lettuce

Arugula Lettuce

Arugula, also known as rocket or rucola, is a leafy green vegetable that is low in calories and packed with various nutrients. Here is the approximate nutrition information for one cup (about 20 grams) of raw arugula:

  • Calories: 5
  • Carbohydrates: 0.7 grams
  • Protein: 0.5 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Fiber: 0.3 grams

Arugula is an excellent source of several essential vitamins and minerals, including:

  • Vitamin K: Arugula is rich in vitamin K, which plays a crucial role in blood clotting and bone health.
  • Vitamin A: It contains beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A, which is essential for vision, immune function, and skin health.
  • Vitamin C: An antioxidant that helps boost the immune system and supports skin health.
  • Folate: An important nutrient, especially during pregnancy, as it aids in cell division and supports the development of the fetal neural tube.
  • Calcium: Crucial for bone health and muscle function.
  • Potassium: Important for heart health and maintaining proper fluid balance in the body.

Arugula also contains small amounts of other nutrients like iron, magnesium, and vitamin E.

It’s worth noting that the nutritional content of vegetables can vary slightly depending on factors like growing conditions, maturity at harvest, and storage. Nevertheless, arugula remains a highly nutritious leafy green that can be a valuable addition to a balanced diet. It’s often enjoyed fresh in salads, and sandwiches, or used as a garnish for various dishes.

Butter Lettuce

Butter Lettuce

Butter lettuce, also known as Bibb or Boston lettuce, is a type of lettuce that is known for its tender leaves and mild, buttery flavor. Like other lettuce varieties, it is low in calories and provides various essential nutrients. Here’s a general overview of the nutrition you can find in butter lettuce, based on a 100-gram serving:

  • Calories: Approximately 13-15 calories
  • Carbohydrates: Around 2.2 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: About 1.1 grams
  • Protein: Roughly 1.4 grams
  • Fat: Less than 0.2 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A: A good source of beta-carotene, which is converted to vitamin A in the body, contributing to healthy vision and immune function.
  • Vitamin K: Important for blood clotting and bone health.
  • Vitamin C: An antioxidant that supports the immune system and helps with collagen formation.
  • Folate: An essential B vitamin important for cell division and DNA synthesis.
  • Vitamin E: An antioxidant that protects cells from damage.

Minerals

  • Calcium: Crucial for strong bones and teeth.
  • Potassium: Helps regulate blood pressure and fluid balance.
  • Iron: Essential for oxygen transport in the blood.
  • Magnesium: Important for muscle and nerve function.
  • Phosphorus: Helps with bone health and energy metabolism.
  • Zinc: Important for immune function and wound healing.

Butter lettuce is also hydrating, as it has a high water content, which contributes to its refreshing and crisp texture.

It’s important to note that the nutritional content can vary slightly depending on factors such as growing conditions and the age of the lettuce. However, overall, butter lettuce can be a nutritious addition to your diet, especially when paired with a variety of other vegetables and proteins to create a well-balanced meal.

Endive Lettuce

Endive Lettuce

Endive lettuce, also known as chicory or curly endive, is a leafy green vegetable that belongs to the Asteraceae family. It is known for its slightly bitter taste and curly, frilly leaves. Endive lettuce is low in calories and provides several essential nutrients. Here’s the approximate nutritional information for a 100-gram serving of raw endive lettuce:

  • Calories: 17 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 3.35 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 3.1 grams
  • Sugars: 0.6 grams
  • Protein: 1.25 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Saturated fat: 0.03 grams
  • Monounsaturated fat: 0.01 grams
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 0.1 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A: 3340 IU (International Units)
  • Vitamin C: 6.5 mg
  • Vitamin K: 231.8 mcg
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 142 mcg

Minerals

  • Calcium: 52 mg
  • Iron: 1.1 mg
  • Magnesium: 15 mg
  • Phosphorus: 29 mg
  • Potassium: 314 mg
  • Sodium: 22 mg
  • Zinc: 0.39 mg

Endive lettuce is a good source of fiber, vitamins A and K, and folate. It is also relatively high in antioxidants, particularly beta-carotene, which gives it its characteristic deep green color. These nutrients play essential roles in maintaining good health and supporting various bodily functions.

Due to its low-calorie content and high nutrient density, endive lettuce can be a great addition to a balanced diet, providing a range of essential vitamins and minerals without contributing significantly to caloric intake. It can be used in salads, added to sandwiches, or cooked as a side dish to enhance the nutritional value of meals.

Green and Red Leaf Lettuce

Green and Red Leaf Lettuce

Both green and red leaf lettuce are popular varieties of lettuce that offer various nutrients and health benefits. While there are slight differences in their nutritional content, they share many common attributes. Here is a general overview of the nutrition you can expect from green and red-leaf lettuce:

Calories: Both green and red leaf lettuce are low in calories, making them an excellent choice for those looking to manage their weight. One cup of shredded lettuce typically contains around 5-10 calories.

Vitamins: Lettuce, in general, is a good source of various vitamins, including vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin C, and folate. These vitamins play important roles in immune function, vision, blood clotting, and overall health.

Minerals: Green and red leaf lettuce also contain essential minerals such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Potassium is important for maintaining proper heart function, while calcium is essential for bone health.

Fiber: Lettuce provides some dietary fiber, which aids in digestion and helps maintain bowel regularity.

Antioxidants: Both green and red leaf lettuce contain antioxidants like beta-carotene and flavonoids. These compounds help neutralize harmful free radicals in the body and contribute to overall health and disease prevention.

Water content: Lettuce has a high water content, which helps keep you hydrated and contributes to a feeling of fullness.

Keep in mind that the specific nutrient content may vary slightly based on factors such as the soil, growing conditions, and maturity of the lettuce.

It’s worth noting that while lettuce provides essential nutrients, it is often consumed as part of larger salads or dishes with other vegetables, proteins, and dressings. So, the overall nutritional profile of your meal will depend on the complete composition of your dish.

Including green and red leaf lettuce in your diet is a great way to add some nutrient-rich greens to your meals, whether you’re aiming to lose weight or simply want to eat a healthier diet.

Romaine Lettuce

Romaine Lettuce

Romaine lettuce is a popular leafy green vegetable known for its crisp texture and mild flavor. It is widely used in salads and as a lettuce wrap alternative. Here is the approximate nutritional information for one cup (about 47 grams) of chopped romaine lettuce:

  • Calories: 8 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 1.5 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: 1 gram
  • Sugars: 0.5 grams
  • Protein: 0.6 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Saturated Fat: <0.1 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: <0.1 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.04 grams
  • Vitamins and Minerals:
  • Vitamin A: 136% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Vitamin K: 82% of the DV
  • Vitamin C: 11% of the DV
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 10% of the DV
  • Iron: 3% of the DV
  • Calcium: 2% of the DV
  • Potassium: 3% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 1% of the DV
  • Phosphorus: 1% of the DV

Romaine lettuce is particularly renowned for its high vitamin A content, mainly in the form of beta-carotene, which gives the lettuce its vibrant green color. Vitamin A is essential for maintaining healthy vision, skin, and immune function.

Additionally, the significant vitamin K content supports blood clotting and bone health. The lettuce also contains a decent amount of vitamin C, which is known for its antioxidant properties and its role in immune system support.

Romaine lettuce is low in calories and carbohydrates, making it an excellent choice for those on a low-calorie or low-carb diet. Its high water content and fiber contribute to a feeling of fullness, which can be beneficial for weight management.

Keep in mind that these nutritional values are approximate and can vary based on factors such as the size and freshness of the lettuce. As with any food, it’s essential to consume a variety of vegetables and a well-balanced diet to ensure you get a wide range of nutrients.

Lima Beans

Lima Beans

Lima beans, also known as butter beans, are nutritious legumes that offer a variety of health benefits. They are a good source of various essential nutrients, including:

Protein: Lima beans are relatively high in protein, making them a good plant-based protein source for vegetarians and vegans.

Dietary Fiber: Lima beans are rich in dietary fiber, which aids in digestion, helps maintain bowel regularity, and may contribute to weight management.

Carbohydrates: They provide complex carbohydrates, which supply a steady source of energy.

Folate (Vitamin B9): Folate is essential for cell division and the formation of DNA. It is especially important for pregnant women to support fetal development.

Iron: Lima beans contain iron, a mineral that plays a vital role in carrying oxygen through the bloodstream and supporting overall energy levels.

Potassium: Potassium is essential for maintaining healthy blood pressure and heart function, and lima beans are a good source of this mineral.

Magnesium: Lima beans provide magnesium, which is important for muscle function, nerve function, and bone health.

Zinc: Lima beans contain zinc, an essential mineral for the immune system and various enzymatic reactions in the body.

Phosphorus: Phosphorus is essential for bone health and energy metabolism, and lima beans contribute to its intake.

Thiamine (Vitamin B1): Thiamine is important for converting food into energy and supporting nerve function.

Vitamin B6: This vitamin is involved in various biochemical reactions, including protein metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis.

Vitamin K: Lima beans contain vitamin K, which is necessary for blood clotting and bone health.

Here is the approximate nutritional content of 1 cup (about 170 grams) of cooked lima beans:

  • Calories: 200 kcal
  • Protein: 10 grams
  • Fat: 0.7 grams
  • Carbohydrates: 36 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: 13 grams
  • Sugars: 0.5 grams
  • Iron: 4.5 mg (25% of the Daily Value)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 156 mcg (39% of the Daily Value)
  • Potassium: 955 mg (20% of the Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: 81 mg (19% of the Daily Value)
  • Phosphorus: 207 mg (19% of the Daily Value)
  • Zinc: 1.7 mg (15% of the Daily Value)
  • Thiamine (Vitamin B1): 0.3 mg (25% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.3 mg (18% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin K: 9.5 mcg (11% of the Daily Value)

Please note that these values are approximate and can vary based on cooking methods and other factors. Lima beans are a nutritious addition to a balanced diet and can be enjoyed in various dishes such as soups, stews, salads, and side dishes.

Mushrooms

Mushrooms

Mushrooms are a unique and nutritious food source, offering a wide array of vitamins, minerals, and other essential nutrients. While the exact nutritional content may vary depending on the mushroom type, the following information provides a general overview of the nutritional benefits of mushrooms:

Protein: Mushrooms are relatively low in calories but contain a reasonable amount of protein. This makes them an excellent option for those seeking a plant-based protein source.

Vitamins

Mushrooms are rich in various vitamins, including:

Vitamin D: Some mushrooms, particularly those exposed to sunlight or UV light, can synthesize vitamin D, which is essential for bone health and immune function.

B Vitamins: Mushrooms are a good source of B vitamins such as riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), and folate (B9). These vitamins are crucial for energy metabolism and other bodily functions.

Vitamin C: While not as abundant as in fruits or vegetables, mushrooms also contain some vitamin C, which supports the immune system and acts as an antioxidant.

Minerals: Mushrooms are a good source of several minerals, including potassium, phosphorus, selenium, and copper.

Fiber: Mushrooms contain dietary fiber, which is beneficial for digestive health and may help regulate blood sugar levels.

Antioxidants: Mushrooms contain various antioxidants like ergothioneine and selenium, which help combat oxidative stress and protect cells from damage.

Low in Fat and Cholesterol: Mushrooms are naturally low in fat and cholesterol, making them a heart-healthy option.

It is important to note that some wild mushrooms can be toxic and should never be consumed unless identified by an expert mycologist as safe. When purchasing mushrooms, it is best to buy them from reputable sources to ensure they are safe to eat.

Mushrooms are a versatile ingredient and can be cooked in numerous ways, such as sautéing, grilling, roasting, or adding to soups and salads. Incorporating mushrooms into a balanced diet can be a tasty way to enjoy their unique flavor while reaping their nutritional benefits.

Okra

Okra

Okra, also known as lady’s finger or bhindi, is a nutritious vegetable that is popular in many cuisines around the world. It is low in calories and contains a variety of essential nutrients. Here’s a breakdown of the nutrition you can find in a 100-gram serving of raw okra:

  • Calories: Approximately 33 calories
  • Carbohydrates: Around 7.45 grams
  • Dietary fiber: Roughly 3.2 grams
  • Sugars: Approximately 1.48 grams
  • Protein: About 2.0 grams
  • Fat: About 0.19 grams
  • Saturated fat: Approximately 0.047 grams
  • Monounsaturated fat: Approximately 0.051 grams
  • Polyunsaturated fat: Approximately 0.071 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin C: Roughly 23 mg (around 38% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin K: Approximately 31.3 mcg (around 39% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Roughly 88 mcg (around 22% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin A: Approximately 375 IU (around 8% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin B6: Roughly 0.215 mg (around 11% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin E: Approximately 0.36 mg (around 2% of the daily recommended intake)

Minerals

  • Calcium: Roughly 82 mg (around 8% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Magnesium: Approximately 57 mg (around 14% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Potassium: Roughly 303 mg (around 8% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Iron: Approximately 0.62 mg (around 3% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Phosphorus: Roughly 61 mg (around 6% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Zinc: Approximately 0.58 mg (around 6% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Manganese: Roughly 0.99 mg (around 49% of the daily recommended intake)

In addition to the nutrients listed above, okra also contains antioxidants, including flavonoids like quercetin, which contribute to its health benefits.

Okra is a good source of dietary fiber, which can help support digestion and maintain bowel regularity. It is also rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant that supports the immune system and aids in the absorption of iron. The vegetable’s vitamin K content contributes to blood clotting and bone health. Additionally, folate (vitamin B9) in okra is essential for cell division and supports prenatal health during pregnancy.

Overall, okra is a nutritious addition to your diet, and it can be enjoyed in various dishes, such as soups, stews, curries, and stir-fries.

Onions

Onions

Onions are a popular vegetable that come in various types and sizes, and they are widely used in cooking to add flavor to dishes. From a nutritional standpoint, onions offer several health benefits. Here’s a breakdown of their nutritional content per 100 grams of raw onion:

Calories: Approximately 40 calories.

Carbohydrates: Onions are relatively low in carbohydrates, providing around 9 grams per 100 grams.

Fiber: Onions are a good source of dietary fiber, containing about 1.7 grams per 100 grams. Fiber is essential for digestive health and may help prevent constipation.

Protein: They have a small amount of protein, about 1.1 grams per 100 grams.

Fat: Onions are virtually fat-free.

Vitamins

Onions are rich in various vitamins, including:

Vitamin C: An essential antioxidant that supports the immune system.

Vitamin B6: Important for metabolism and brain function.

Folate (Vitamin B9): Crucial for cell growth and development, particularly important for pregnant women.

Minerals

Onions contain various minerals, such as:

Potassium: An important mineral for heart health and maintaining proper fluid balance.

Calcium: Essential for bone health.

Magnesium: Contributes to nerve function and bone health.

Antioxidants: Onions contain various antioxidants, including quercetin, which may have anti-inflammatory and heart-protective properties.

Additionally, onions contain sulfur compounds, which are responsible for their pungent aroma and have been associated with potential health benefits, such as supporting cardiovascular health and reducing the risk of certain types of cancers.

It’s essential to note that the nutritional content of onions may vary slightly depending on the type and how they are prepared (raw, cooked, or grilled).

Overall, including onions in your diet can be a flavorful way to enhance the nutritional value of your meals and support overall health. However, if you have specific dietary restrictions or medical conditions, it’s always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian for personalized advice.

Green Onions

Green Onions

Green onions, also known as scallions or spring onions, are a popular vegetable used in various cuisines around the world. They are characterized by long green stalks and small white bulbs. Here’s a general overview of the nutrition of green onions based on a standard 100-gram serving:

  • Calories: Approximately 32 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: About 7.3 grams
  • Sugars: Approximately 2.5 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: Roughly 2.6 grams
  • Protein: About 1.8 grams
  • Fat: Approximately 0.2 grams

Vitamins and Minerals

  • Vitamin C: Around 18 mg (30% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin A: Approximately 1453 IU (29% of the Daily Value)
  • Vitamin K: Roughly 207 mcg (259% of the Daily Value)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): About 64 mcg (16% of the Daily Value)
  • Potassium: Around 276 mg (8% of the Daily Value)
  • Calcium: Approximately 72 mg (7% of the Daily Value)
  • Iron: Roughly 1.48 mg (8% of the Daily Value)
  • Magnesium: About 20 mg (5% of the Daily Value)

Green onions are low in calories and fat while being a good source of vitamins and minerals. They contain notable amounts of vitamin C, vitamin A, and vitamin K, all of which contribute to various aspects of overall health.

These values may vary slightly depending on the size and freshness of the green onions. Including them in your diet can add a burst of flavor to your dishes and provide some essential nutrients.

Parsnips

Parsnips

Parsnips are a root vegetable that belongs to the Apiaceae family, which also includes carrots, celery, and parsley. They are commonly consumed as a culinary ingredient and offer various nutritional benefits. Here is the approximate nutritional information for 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of raw parsnips:

  • Calories: 75 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 17 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 5.6 grams
  • Sugars: 4.8 grams
  • Protein: 1.2 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams
  • Vitamin C: 17 mg (28% of the Daily Value, DV)
  • Vitamin K: 26 mcg (32% DV)
  • Folate: 67 mcg (17% DV)
  • Potassium: 375 mg (11% DV)
  • Manganese: 0.4 mg (22% DV)
  • Magnesium: 29 mg (7% DV)

Parsnips are a good source of dietary fiber, which is essential for digestive health and may help in maintaining a healthy weight. They are also rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant that supports the immune system and helps the body absorb iron. Vitamin K is important for blood clotting and bone health, while folate is essential for DNA synthesis and cell growth.

Additionally, parsnips provide valuable minerals like potassium, which helps regulate blood pressure, and manganese, which is involved in various enzymatic reactions in the body. Magnesium in parsnips plays a role in muscle and nerve function, among other physiological processes.

Keep in mind that the nutritional content may vary slightly depending on factors like the size and freshness of the parsnips. Cooking methods can also influence the nutrient content, with boiling, steaming, or microwaving being better options to preserve nutrients compared to frying.

Overall, incorporating parsnips into your diet can be a nutritious and delicious way to enjoy the benefits of this root vegetable.

Peas

Peas

Peas are a nutritious and versatile vegetable that belongs to the legume family. They are known for their sweet and slightly starchy taste, and they come in various types, including green peas, snow peas, and sugar snap peas. Peas are commonly consumed in both fresh and frozen forms, and they are also used in various culinary dishes.

Nutritional Content of Peas (per 100g serving of cooked peas):

  • Calories: Approximately 81 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: About 14.5g
  • Dietary Fiber: Approximately 5.1g
  • Sugars: Around 5.7g
  • Protein: Roughly 5.4g
  • Fat: Approximately 0.4g

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A: About 765 IU (International Units)
  • Vitamin C: Approximately 13.2mg
  • Vitamin K: Around 24.8mcg
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Approximately 65mcg

Minerals

  • Potassium: About 244mg
  • Magnesium: Approximately 33mg
  • Iron: Around 1.5mg
  • Zinc: Roughly 1.2mg

Peas are also a good source of antioxidants, including flavonoids and carotenoids, which help to protect the body’s cells from oxidative stress. Additionally, they are low in calories and fat while being rich in nutrients, making them a healthy addition to a balanced diet.

Snap Sugar Peas

Snap Sugar Peas

Snap sugar peas, also known as sugar snap peas, are a type of edible podded pea that is sweet and crunchy. They are a nutritious vegetable and a good source of various vitamins and minerals. Here’s the approximate nutritional content for one cup (about 98 grams) of raw snap sugar peas:

  • Calories: 41 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 7.9 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 2.5 grams
  • Sugars: 4.0 grams
  • Protein: 2.5 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin C: 58% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Vitamin A: 33% DV
  • Vitamin K: 24% DV
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 13% DV
  • Iron: 6% DV
  • Magnesium: 5% DV
  • Potassium: 4% DV

Sugar snap peas are a low-calorie, low-fat vegetable that provides valuable nutrients, including vitamins C, A, and K, which are essential for immune function, vision, and blood clotting, respectively. They also contain dietary fiber, which aids in digestion, and various minerals important for overall health.

Keep in mind that the nutritional values may differ slightly based on the specific variety and how they are prepared or cooked. If you need the most up-to-date and accurate nutritional information, it’s best to check the packaging or consult a reliable nutrition database.

Snow Peas

Snow Peas

Snow peas, also known as sugar snap peas, are a type of legume that are commonly consumed as a vegetable. They are known for their sweet flavor and crunchy texture. Snow peas are a nutritious addition to your diet, providing various essential nutrients. Here is the approximate nutritional information for one cup (about 98 grams) of raw snow peas:

  • Calories: 41 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 7.6 grams
  • Fiber: 2.7 grams
  • Protein: 2.8 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin C: 60% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Vitamin A: 16% DV
  • Vitamin K: 24% DV
  • Folate: 13% DV
  • Iron: 8% DV
  • Magnesium: 6% DV
  • Phosphorus: 6% DV
  • Potassium: 5% DV
  • Vitamin B6: 5% DV

Snow peas are relatively low in calories and provide a good amount of dietary fiber, which can help support digestive health. They are also a great source of vitamin C, which is essential for a healthy immune system and the formation of collagen, a protein that supports skin, cartilage, and bones. Additionally, they contain vitamin A, which is important for vision and skin health, as well as vitamin K, which is involved in blood clotting and bone health.

Moreover, snow peas offer various minerals like iron, which is necessary for oxygen transport in the blood, magnesium for muscle and nerve function, and potassium for maintaining healthy blood pressure levels. The presence of vitamin B6 is also valuable, as it helps with energy metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis.

Overall, snow peas are a nutritious vegetable that can be easily incorporated into salads, stir-fries, or enjoyed as a crunchy snack. Including a variety of vegetables like snow peas in your diet can contribute to a balanced and healthy lifestyle.

Anaheim Peppers

Anaheim Peppers

Anaheim peppers, also known as New Mexico chilies or California chilies, are a popular type of chili pepper with a mild to medium level of spiciness. They are commonly used in various cuisines, especially in Mexican and Southwestern dishes. Here’s an overview of the nutritional content of Anaheim peppers based on a standard serving size of 1 pepper (approximately 45 grams):

  • Calories: Approximately 18 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: About 4 grams
  • Fiber: Around 1 gram
  • Protein: Roughly 1 gram
  • Fat: Almost 0 grams
  • Vitamin C: A significant source of vitamin C, providing more than 100% of the recommended daily intake.
  • Vitamin A: Provides a good amount of vitamin A.
  • Vitamin K: Contains a small amount of vitamin K.
  • Other minerals and vitamins: Contains small amounts of minerals like potassium and magnesium.

It’s important to note that the nutritional content may vary slightly based on the size and ripeness of the pepper. Also, the values mentioned above are approximate and can vary depending on the source and the specific variety of Anaheim pepper.

Anaheim peppers are low in calories and a good source of vitamins and minerals, making them a healthy addition to your diet. Additionally, their mild spiciness makes them versatile for use in various dishes, including salads, salsas, sauces, and stuffed recipes.

If you have specific dietary concerns or health conditions, it’s always a good idea to consult a registered dietitian or nutritionist for personalized advice.

Sweet Peppers

Sweet Peppers

Sweet peppers, also known as bell peppers, come in various colors such as red, green, yellow, and orange. They are not only delicious but also offer several nutritional benefits. Here’s the nutrition profile of sweet peppers per 100 grams (raw):

Calories: Approximately 20-30 calories, depending on the color. Red peppers tend to be slightly higher in calories due to their natural sugars.

Carbohydrates: Around 4-6 grams of carbohydrates, with a small portion coming from sugars and the rest from dietary fiber.

Dietary Fiber: Sweet peppers are a good source of dietary fiber, providing about 1-2 grams per 100 grams. Fiber is essential for digestive health and helps maintain a feeling of fullness.

Vitamins

Sweet peppers are rich in various vitamins, including:

Vitamin C: Red peppers, in particular, are high in vitamin C, which is a powerful antioxidant that supports the immune system and skin health.

Vitamin A: Especially prominent in red and orange peppers, vitamin A is essential for vision, immune function, and skin health.

Vitamin B6: Important for metabolism and brain health.

Folate (Vitamin B9): Necessary for cell division and the production of DNA.

Minerals: Sweet peppers contain small amounts of essential minerals like potassium, magnesium, and iron.

Antioxidants: Sweet peppers are packed with antioxidants, such as carotenoids and flavonoids, which help protect the body’s cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Low in Fat: Sweet peppers are naturally low in fat, making them a great addition to a healthy diet.

Overall, sweet peppers are a nutritious addition to your diet, providing vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber. They can be eaten raw, cooked, stuffed, and added to salads, stir-fries, and many other dishes to add flavor and color while boosting nutritional content.

Potatoes

Potatoes

Potatoes are a popular starchy vegetable that provides a range of essential nutrients. The nutritional content of potatoes can vary depending on their type, preparation method, and serving size. Here’s a general overview of the nutrition you can find in an average medium-sized (150-gram) potato that has been baked or boiled without additional ingredients:

  • Calories: Approximately 110 calories
  • Carbohydrates: Around 26 grams, primarily in the form of starch.
  • Dietary Fiber: About 2 grams. Fiber is essential for digestion and can help regulate blood sugar levels and support heart health.
  • Protein: Roughly 2 grams, though this can vary slightly based on the potato’s size and type.
  • Fat: Negligible amounts of fat, less than 0.2 grams.
  • Vitamins: Potatoes are a good source of several vitamins, including vitamin C, vitamin B6, and folate (vitamin B9). Vitamin C is an antioxidant that supports the immune system and skin health.
  • Minerals: Potatoes contain potassium, magnesium, and trace amounts of other minerals like iron and zinc. Potassium is important for heart health and maintaining proper muscle and nerve function.
  • Antioxidants: Potatoes contain various phytonutrients and antioxidants, such as flavonoids, which may contribute to overall health and well-being.

Keep in mind that when you prepare potatoes using methods like frying or adding excessive amounts of butter, cheese, or other high-calorie toppings, the nutritional content will change significantly. Additionally, different varieties of potatoes can have slightly different nutrient profiles.

Potatoes are a versatile and nutritious food when prepared in a healthy manner, making them a valuable addition to a balanced diet. However, if you have specific dietary concerns or health conditions, it’s always best to consult with a registered dietitian or healthcare professional for personalized advice.

Pumpkin

Pumpkins are a popular and nutritious vegetable, rich in various vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. They belong to the Cucurbitaceae family and are known for their vibrant orange color and sweet flavor. Here’s an overview of the nutrition you can find in pumpkins:

Vitamins

Pumpkins are an excellent source of several vitamins, including:

  • Vitamin A: One of the most abundant nutrients in pumpkins, provides beta-carotene, which is essential for good vision, skin health, and immune function.
  • Vitamin C: An antioxidant that supports the immune system, helps in collagen production and aids in wound healing.
  • Vitamin E: Another antioxidant that protects cells from oxidative damage.

Minerals

Pumpkins contain various minerals, such as:

  • Potassium: Important for maintaining proper heart function and blood pressure regulation.
  • Magnesium: Essential for muscle and nerve function, bone health, and energy production.
  • Iron: Crucial for transporting oxygen in the blood and supporting metabolism.
  • Fiber: Pumpkins are a good source of dietary fiber, which aids digestion, promotes satiety, and helps regulate blood sugar levels.

Antioxidants: Pumpkins contain several antioxidants, such as beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin, which may protect against chronic diseases and promote eye health.

Low in Calories: Pumpkins are relatively low in calories, making them a healthy option for those watching their weight.

Essential Fatty Acids: Pumpkin seeds, also known as pepitas, are rich in healthy fats, including omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.

The nutritional content of pumpkins may vary slightly depending on factors such as variety, ripeness, and preparation methods. In general, both the flesh and seeds of pumpkins are nutritious and can be included in a well-balanced diet.

To incorporate pumpkins into your meals, you can use them in soups, stews, curries, roasted dishes, smoothies, and even baked goods like pumpkin pies. Be creative, and enjoy the nutritional benefits of this delicious vegetable!

Radicchio

Radicchio

Radicchio is a type of leafy vegetable that belongs to the chicory family. It is known for its vibrant red or purple color and slightly bitter taste. This vegetable is commonly used in salads, grilled, or roasted as a side dish. Radicchio is not only delicious but also offers several nutritional benefits. Here are some key nutritional components of radicchio:

Vitamins: Radicchio is a good source of vitamins, particularly vitamin K and vitamin C. Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting and bone health, while vitamin C is an antioxidant that supports the immune system and helps in collagen synthesis.

Minerals: It contains important minerals such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Potassium is crucial for heart health and proper muscle function. Calcium is essential for strong bones and teeth, while magnesium plays a role in various physiological processes in the body.

Fiber: Radicchio is a good source of dietary fiber, which aids in digestion, helps maintain bowel regularity, and may assist in weight management.

Antioxidants: This vegetable contains various antioxidants, including flavonoids and polyphenols, which help neutralize harmful free radicals in the body, potentially reducing the risk of chronic diseases and supporting overall health.

Phytonutrients: Radicchio contains phytochemicals that have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, contributing to its potential health benefits.

Low in Calories: Radicchio is relatively low in calories, making it a good choice for those watching their calorie intake while still providing essential nutrients.

It’s essential to include a variety of vegetables in your diet to ensure you get a wide range of nutrients. However, if you have any specific health conditions or dietary concerns, it’s always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional or a registered dietitian to tailor your diet to your individual needs.

Radish

Radish

Radishes are a nutritious and low-calorie vegetable that belongs to the Brassicaceae family. They are rich in essential nutrients and offer several health benefits. Here’s the general nutritional profile of radishes per 100 grams of raw radishes:

  • Calories: Approximately 16 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: Around 3.4 grams
  • Dietary fiber: Approximately 1.6 grams
  • Sugars: About 1.9 grams
  • Protein: Roughly 0.7 grams
  • Fat: Nearly 0.1 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin C: Radishes are an excellent source of vitamin C, providing around 14 mg per 100 grams. Vitamin C is an essential antioxidant that supports the immune system and helps in collagen synthesis.
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Approximately 25 mcg
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): Around 0.04 mg
  • Vitamin B6: Approximately 0.07 mg
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): Approximately 0.3 mg
  • Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5): About 0.1 mg

Minerals

  • Potassium: Radishes contain roughly 233 mg of potassium, which is essential for heart health and proper muscle function.
  • Calcium: Around 25 mg
  • Magnesium: Approximately 10 mg
  • Phosphorus: About 20 mg

Other beneficial compounds

  • Antioxidants: Radishes contain various antioxidants like quercetin, anthocyanins, and isothiocyanates, which help in neutralizing free radicals in the body.
  • Sulforaphane: This compound found in radishes has been associated with potential cancer-preventive properties.

Additionally, radishes are low in calories and have a high water content, making them a hydrating option for snacks or salads. Including radishes in your diet can be a great way to boost your nutrient intake while adding a refreshing and crunchy element to your meals.

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rhubarb is a unique vegetable often used in cooking for its tart flavor. It is known for its pink to red stalks and large, green leaves. While the stalks are edible and commonly used in pies, jams, and desserts, the leaves are toxic and should not be consumed.

Here is the approximate nutrition information for 1 cup (approximately 122 grams) of raw, diced rhubarb:

  • Calories: 26
  • Carbohydrates: 6.2 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 2.2 grams
  • Sugars: 1.3 grams
  • Protein: 0.9 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin C: 9.8 milligrams (about 16% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Vitamin K: 29.4 micrograms (about 37% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Calcium: 105 milligrams (about 11% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Potassium: 351 milligrams (about 7% of the recommended daily intake)

Rhubarb is a low-calorie vegetable that contains small amounts of essential nutrients like vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, and potassium. It also provides some dietary fiber, which can be beneficial for digestive health. However, keep in mind that rhubarb’s tartness often requires added sugar when used in recipes, which can increase the calorie and sugar content of the dishes it’s used in.

As with any food, moderation is key. Rhubarb can be a healthy addition to a balanced diet, but it should be enjoyed as part of a varied and nutritious eating plan. If you have any specific dietary concerns or conditions, it’s always a good idea to consult with a registered dietitian or healthcare professional for personalized advice.

Romanesco (cauliflower)

Romanesco (cauliflower)

Romanesco, also known as Romanesco cauliflower or broccoflower, is a unique and visually striking vegetable that is closely related to cauliflower and broccoli. It belongs to the Brassica oleracea species, just like its more familiar counterparts. Here is the approximate nutritional information for a 100-gram serving of raw Romanesco:

  • Calories: 25 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 4.1 g
  • Dietary fiber: 2.0 g
  • Sugars: 1.7 g
  • Protein: 2.5 g
  • Fat: 0.3 g
  • Vitamin C: 69 mg (115% DV – Daily Value)
  • Vitamin K: 17.7 mcg (22% DV)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.2 mg (12% DV)
  • Folate: 57 mcg (14% DV)
  • Vitamin A: 10 IU (2% DV)
  • Calcium: 22 mg (2% DV)
  • Iron: 0.4 mg (2% DV)
  • Magnesium: 15 mg (4% DV)
  • Potassium: 298 mg (8% DV)
  • Phosphorus: 62 mg (6% DV)
  • Manganese: 0.2 mg (11% DV)

Romanesco is a low-calorie vegetable that provides a good amount of fiber, making it suitable for weight management and digestive health. It is a rich source of vitamin C, an essential antioxidant that supports the immune system and promotes healthy skin. The vegetable also contains significant amounts of vitamin K, which plays a role in blood clotting and bone health.

Moreover, Romanesco contains vitamin B6, which is essential for metabolism and nervous system function, and folate, which is vital for cell division and DNA synthesis. While it is not as high in vitamin A as some other vegetables, it still contributes to your daily intake of this essential nutrient.

Like other cruciferous vegetables, Romanesco contains beneficial phytochemicals like glucosinolates, which have been associated with potential health benefits, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Incorporating Romanesco into your diet can be a great way to diversify your vegetable intake and provide your body with essential vitamins and minerals. Enjoy it raw in salads, lightly steamed, roasted, or sautéed to preserve its nutrient content and unique flavor.

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Rutabaga, also known as Swede or yellow turnip, is a root vegetable that belongs to the Brassica genus, which includes vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. Rutabagas are nutritious and versatile vegetables with several health benefits. Here is the approximate nutrition profile of a 1-cup (140-gram) serving of cooked rutabaga:

  • Calories: 50
  • Carbohydrates: 12 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 3 grams
  • Sugars: 6 grams
  • Protein: 2 grams
  • Fat: 0 grams
  • Vitamin C: 35 milligrams (about 58% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Vitamin E: 1.5 milligrams (about 8% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Vitamin K: 3.8 micrograms (about 5% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.2 milligrams (about 10% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 30 micrograms (about 8% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Potassium: 450 milligrams (about 13% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Magnesium: 28 milligrams (about 7% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Phosphorus: 55 milligrams (about 6% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Calcium: 66 milligrams (about 7% of the recommended daily intake)

Rutabagas are low in calories and fat while being a good source of fiber, which can aid in digestion and promote a feeling of fullness. They also provide a significant amount of vitamin C, an essential antioxidant that supports the immune system and helps the body absorb iron from plant-based foods.

Additionally, rutabagas contain important minerals like potassium and magnesium, which play roles in maintaining heart health, nerve function, and muscle function. The presence of vitamin B6 and folate is beneficial for various metabolic processes and overall well-being.

Rutabagas are a great addition to a balanced diet and can be enjoyed roasted, boiled, mashed, or incorporated into stews and soups to boost the nutritional value of your meals. As with any food, moderation is key, and it’s always best to consume a variety of vegetables to get a wide range of nutrients.

Shallots

Shallots

Shallots are a type of onion and are commonly used in cooking to add flavor to various dishes. They are known for their mild, sweet, and delicate taste. From a nutritional perspective, shallots offer a range of beneficial nutrients. Here are some key nutritional facts for a 100-gram serving of raw shallots:

  • Calories: ~72 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: ~16.8 grams
  • Sugars: ~7.9 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: ~3.2 grams
  • Protein: ~2.5 grams
  • Fat: ~0.1 grams
  • Saturated Fat: ~0.03 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: ~0.02 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: ~0.05 grams

Vitamins and Minerals

  • Vitamin C: ~8.0 milligrams (13% of the Daily Recommended Intake – DRI)
  • Vitamin B6: ~0.345 milligrams (17% of the DRI)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): ~34 micrograms (9% of the DRI)
  • Potassium: ~334 milligrams (10% of the DRI)
  • Manganese: ~0.292 milligrams (15% of the DRI)

Shallots are also rich in antioxidants, such as quercetin and allicin, which may have various health benefits. Antioxidants help neutralize harmful free radicals in the body, potentially reducing the risk of chronic diseases.

It’s important to note that the nutritional content may vary slightly depending on the variety and growing conditions of the shallots. Including shallots as part of a balanced diet can be a great way to add flavor to your meals while benefiting from their nutrient content.

Spinach

Spinach

Spinach is a highly nutritious leafy green vegetable that is widely recognized for its health benefits. Here are the key nutritional facts for a 100-gram serving of raw spinach:

 

  • Calories: ~23 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: ~3.6 grams
  • Sugars: ~0.4 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: ~2.2 grams
  • Protein: ~2.9 grams
  • Fat: ~0.4 grams
  • Saturated Fat: ~0.06 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: ~0.01 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: ~0.17 grams

Vitamins and Minerals

  • Vitamin A: ~469 micrograms (52% of the Daily Recommended Intake – DRI)
  • Vitamin C: ~28.1 milligrams (31% of the DRI)
  • Vitamin K: ~482.9 micrograms (402% of the DRI)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): ~194 micrograms (49% of the DRI)
  • Iron: ~2.71 milligrams (15% of the DRI)
  • Calcium: ~99 milligrams (10% of the DRI)
  • Potassium: ~558 milligrams (12% of the DRI)
  • Magnesium: ~79 milligrams (19% of the DRI)

Spinach is also rich in various antioxidants, including beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. These antioxidants help protect the body’s cells from oxidative stress and may have various health benefits.

Due to its low-calorie content and high nutrient density, spinach is considered a powerhouse vegetable. It can be enjoyed in salads, smoothies, stir-fries, and numerous other dishes, making it a versatile and healthy addition to your diet.

Squash

Squash

Squash is a diverse group of vegetables that come in various shapes, sizes, and colors. Some common types of squash include butternut squash, acorn squash, zucchini (courgette), and spaghetti squash. Each type of squash has slightly different nutritional profiles, but in general, they are low in calories and rich in essential nutrients. Here are the key nutritional facts for a 100-gram serving of raw squash (average values):

  • Calories: ~16 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: ~3.4 grams
  • Sugars: ~1.0 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: ~1.0 grams
  • Protein: ~0.6 grams
  • Fat: ~0.2 grams
  • Saturated Fat: ~0.04 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: ~0.03 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: ~0.06 grams

Vitamins and Minerals

  • Vitamin A: ~169 micrograms (19% of the Daily Recommended Intake – DRI)
  • Vitamin C: ~17.1 milligrams (19% of the DRI)
  • Vitamin K: ~4.0 micrograms (4% of the DRI)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): ~24 micrograms (6% of the DRI)
  • Potassium: ~320 milligrams (7% of the DRI)
  • Magnesium: ~17 milligrams (4% of the DRI)

Squash is an excellent source of vitamins A and C, both of which are essential for maintaining healthy skin, supporting the immune system, and promoting good vision. It also contains a variety of antioxidants and phytonutrients, such as beta-carotene and lutein, which contribute to its health benefits.

The exact nutrient content may vary depending on the type of squash and its ripeness. For example, butternut squash tends to be higher in calories and carbohydrates than zucchini. Squash is a versatile vegetable that can be cooked in numerous ways, making it a nutritious and delicious addition to any balanced diet.

Acorn Squash

Acorn Squash

Acorn squash, also known as winter squash, is a nutritious vegetable that belongs to the gourd family. It is typically available during the fall and winter seasons and is known for its sweet, nutty flavor. Acorn squash is a good source of various vitamins, minerals, and fiber, making it a healthy addition to your diet. Here’s a general overview of the nutrition you can find in a one-cup (205g) serving of cooked, baked, or mashed acorn squash:

  • Calories: Approximately 115 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: Around 30 grams
  • Fiber: Roughly 9 grams
  • Protein: About 2 grams
  • Fat: Nearly 1 gram
  • Vitamin A: Over 14,500 IU (International Units)
  • Vitamin C: About 20 milligrams
  • Vitamin B6: Approximately 0.3 milligrams
  • Vitamin E: About 2 milligrams
  • Vitamin K: Around 31 micrograms
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): Roughly 0.2 milligrams
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): Approximately 2.5 milligrams
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Around 36 micrograms
  • Potassium: Over 890 milligrams
  • Magnesium: Approximately 58 milligrams
  • Phosphorus: About 61 milligrams
  • Calcium: Roughly 90 milligrams
  • Iron: Approximately 1.4 milligrams
  • Zinc: About 0.5 milligrams

Acorn squash is low in calories and fat while providing a significant amount of dietary fiber, making it a filling and satisfying addition to your meals. It is rich in vitamins A and C, which are essential for immune function, skin health, and vision. The vegetable also contains several B vitamins, which play vital roles in metabolism and energy production.

Furthermore, acorn squash is a good source of minerals such as potassium, magnesium, and calcium, which are essential for maintaining healthy bones, nerve function, and heart health. Additionally, it contains some iron and zinc, which are important for supporting the immune system and overall well-being.

To get the most nutritional benefits from acorn squash, it is best to cook it by baking, roasting, or steaming rather than frying it, as frying can add unnecessary calories and reduce its nutritional value. Enjoying acorn squash as part of a balanced diet can contribute to your overall health and well-being.

Butternut Squash

Butternut Squash

Butternut squash is another popular winter squash variety that is not only delicious but also packed with essential nutrients. Like acorn squash, it is a versatile and healthy addition to your diet. Here’s a general overview of the nutrition you can find in a one-cup (205g) serving of cooked, mashed, or baked butternut squash:

  • Calories: Approximately 82 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: Around 22 grams
  • Fiber: Roughly 6.6 grams
  • Protein: About 1.8 grams
  • Fat: Nearly 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin A: Over 14,800 IU (International Units)
  • Vitamin C: About 31 milligrams
  • Vitamin B6: Approximately 0.2 milligrams
  • Vitamin E: About 2 milligrams
  • Vitamin K: Around 1.1 micrograms
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): Roughly 0.1 milligrams
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): Approximately 1.2 milligrams
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Around 39 micrograms
  • Potassium: Over 582 milligrams
  • Magnesium: Approximately 51 milligrams
  • Phosphorus: About 42 milligrams
  • Calcium: Roughly 84 milligrams
  • Iron: Approximately 1.4 milligrams
  • Zinc: About 0.3 milligrams

Butternut squash is relatively low in calories and fat while being a good source of dietary fiber. It is an excellent source of vitamin A in the form of beta-carotene, which is essential for eye health, immune function, and skin health. The vegetable also provides a notable amount of vitamin C, which supports the immune system and acts as an antioxidant.

Additionally, butternut squash contains various B vitamins, which are important for energy metabolism and nervous system health. It also supplies essential minerals like potassium, magnesium, and calcium, which are crucial for heart health, bone health, and muscle function.

Including butternut squash in your meals can be a nutritious way to add flavor and variety to your diet while reaping the numerous health benefits it offers. Like acorn squash, it’s best to prepare butternut squash by baking, roasting, or steaming to preserve its nutrients and avoid adding excess calories.

Patti Pan Squash

Patti Pan Squash

Pattypan squash, also known as scallop squash or sunburst squash, is a small, round, and flat summer squash variety. Like other summer squashes, pattypan squash is low in calories and carbohydrates while providing several essential nutrients. Here’s a general overview of the nutrition you can find in a one-cup (approximately 115g) serving of cooked pattypan squash:

  • Calories: Approximately 20 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: Around 4 grams
  • Fiber: Roughly 1.5 grams
  • Protein: About 1 gram
  • Fat: Nearly 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin A: Over 400 IU (International Units)
  • Vitamin C: About 11 milligrams
  • Vitamin B6: Approximately 0.1 milligrams
  • Vitamin K: Around 3.5 micrograms
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Roughly 19 micrograms
  • Potassium: Over 180 milligrams
  • Magnesium: Approximately 14 milligrams
  • Phosphorus: About 22 milligrams
  • Calcium: Roughly 15 milligrams
  • Iron: Approximately 0.4 milligrams
  • Zinc: About 0.2 milligrams

Pattypan squash is very low in calories, making it a great option for those looking to manage their calorie intake. It contains some carbohydrates and dietary fiber, contributing to a feeling of fullness and aiding in digestion.

It also provides essential vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin A, vitamin C, and potassium. Vitamin A is essential for maintaining healthy vision, while vitamin C acts as an antioxidant and supports the immune system. Potassium is crucial for maintaining proper heart function and helps regulate blood pressure.

Overall, pattypan squash is a nutritious addition to your diet, particularly during the summer months when it’s in season. It can be prepared in various ways, including sautéing, grilling, roasting, or adding to soups and stews. Just like with other vegetables, it’s best to avoid overcooking to retain its nutritional value.

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti squash is a unique variety of winter squash known for its stringy, noodle-like flesh, which resembles spaghetti when cooked. It is a popular low-carb and gluten-free alternative to traditional pasta. Here’s a general overview of the nutrition you can find in a one-cup (approximately 155g) serving of cooked spaghetti squash:

  • Calories: Approximately 42 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: Around 10 grams
  • Fiber: Roughly 2.2 grams
  • Protein: About 0.6 grams
  • Fat: Nearly 0.4 grams
  • Vitamin A: Over 190 IU (International Units)
  • Vitamin C: About 3.5 milligrams
  • Vitamin B6: Approximately 0.1 milligrams
  • Vitamin K: Around 1.6 micrograms
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Roughly 5 micrograms
  • Potassium: Over 180 milligrams
  • Magnesium: Approximately 12 milligrams
  • Phosphorus: About 15 milligrams
  • Calcium: Roughly 31 milligrams
  • Iron: Approximately 0.4 milligrams
  • Zinc: About 0.3 milligrams

As you can see, spaghetti squash is very low in calories and carbohydrates compared to traditional pasta, making it a popular choice for those following low-carb or calorie-conscious diets.

Despite its low calorie and carbohydrate content, spaghetti squash offers essential vitamins and minerals. It contains some vitamin A, which is essential for vision and immune function, and vitamin C, which acts as an antioxidant and supports the immune system.

Spaghetti squash also provides small amounts of B vitamins, potassium, magnesium, and calcium, which are important for various bodily functions, including nerve function, muscle health, and bone health.

One of the main health benefits of spaghetti squash is its fiber content, which helps with digestion, supports gut health, and can aid in weight management by promoting a feeling of fullness.

To prepare spaghetti squash, you can simply roast it in the oven until the flesh is tender, and then use a fork to scrape out the “spaghetti-like” strands. It can be served with various sauces and toppings, making it a versatile and healthy alternative to traditional pasta dishes.

Swede

Swede

Swede, also known as rutabaga or Swedish turnip, is a root vegetable that belongs to the Brassicaceae family, which includes cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. Swede is known for its distinctive flavor, which is a combination of a turnip and a cabbage. Here’s a general overview of the nutrition you can find in a one-cup (approximately 140g) serving of cooked swede:

  • Calories: Approximately 66 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: Around 15 grams
  • Fiber: Roughly 4 grams
  • Protein: About 2 grams
  • Fat: Nearly 0.3 grams
  • Vitamin C: About 27 milligrams
  • Vitamin B6: Approximately 0.2 milligrams
  • Vitamin K: Around 9 micrograms
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): Roughly 36 micrograms
  • Potassium: Over 400 milligrams
  • Magnesium: Approximately 32 milligrams
  • Phosphorus: About 65 milligrams
  • Calcium: Roughly 55 milligrams
  • Iron: Approximately 1 milligram
  • Zinc: About 0.5 milligrams

Swede is a low-calorie vegetable that is relatively low in carbohydrates but provides a good amount of dietary fiber. The fiber in swede helps with digestion, promotes gut health, and can aid in weight management by providing a feeling of fullness.

The vegetable is a good source of vitamin C, an essential antioxidant that supports the immune system and helps protect the body from free radical damage. It also contains vitamin B6, which is important for metabolism and brain function, as well as vitamin K, which is essential for blood clotting and bone health.

Swede provides several essential minerals, including potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium, iron, and zinc. These minerals play crucial roles in various bodily functions, such as maintaining proper nerve and muscle function, supporting bone health, and ensuring healthy red blood cell production.

Swede can be enjoyed in various ways, including roasting, steaming, mashing, or adding to soups and stews. It’s a nutritious addition to your diet and can be a delicious alternative to other root vegetables like potatoes and carrots.

Sweet Potato

Sweet Potato

Sweet potatoes are a highly nutritious and delicious root vegetable that provides a wide range of health benefits. They are an excellent source of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants. Here’s a breakdown of the key nutritional components of sweet potatoes per 100 grams of raw, uncooked sweet potato:

  • Calories: Approximately 86 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: About 20.1 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: Roughly 3 grams
  • Sugars: About 4.2 grams
  • Protein: Around 1.6 grams
  • Fat: Negligible amount, less than 0.1 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A: Extremely high, with more than 14,000 IU (International Units). Sweet potatoes are one of the best sources of beta-carotene, which the body converts into vitamin A, supporting eye health, immune function, and skin health.
  • Vitamin C: About 2.4 milligrams, contributing to immune system support and collagen production.
  • Vitamin B6: Around 0.2 milligrams, essential for metabolism, nerve function, and brain development.
  • Vitamin E: A small amount, offering antioxidant benefits.

Minerals

  • Potassium: Approximately 337 milligrams, important for heart health and maintaining proper blood pressure.
  • Magnesium: Around 25 milligrams, supporting muscle and nerve function, as well as bone health.
  • Iron: Roughly 0.7 milligrams, contributing to the formation of hemoglobin and oxygen transport in the blood.
  • Calcium: About 30 milligrams, aiding in bone health.
  • Antioxidants: Sweet potatoes contain various antioxidants, including beta-carotene, which help neutralize harmful free radicals in the body and reduce oxidative stress.

The nutritional content of sweet potatoes can vary depending on the variety and how they are prepared (baked, boiled, mashed, etc.). Overall, sweet potatoes are an excellent addition to a balanced diet, especially due to their high vitamin A content, fiber, and complex carbohydrates that can help stabilize blood sugar levels and provide lasting energy. Incorporating sweet potatoes into your meals can contribute to a healthy and nutritious diet.

Tomatillo

Tomatillo

Tomatillos, also known as Mexican green tomatoes, are small, green, and tangy fruits that are commonly used in Mexican cuisine, particularly in salsa verde. They are rich in various vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here’s a breakdown of the key nutritional components of tomatillos per 100 grams:

  • Calories: Approximately 32 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: About 5.8 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: Roughly 1.9 grams
  • Sugars: About 3.9 grams
  • Protein: Around 0.9 grams
  • Fat: Approximately 0.2 grams

Vitamins

Vitamin C: Tomatillos are an excellent source of vitamin C, providing about 15 milligrams per 100 grams. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that supports the immune system, skin health, and collagen production.

Minerals

Potassium: Approximately 230 milligrams, which is beneficial for heart health and maintaining proper blood pressure.

Phosphorus: Around 41 milligrams, contributing to bone health and various cellular processes.

Antioxidants: Tomatillos contain various antioxidants, such as vitamin C and flavonoids, which help protect the body from harmful free radicals and reduce oxidative stress.

It’s important to note that tomatillos are typically not consumed in large quantities on their own but are often used as an ingredient in recipes such as salsa verde, soups, stews, and sauces. They add a distinct tartness and flavor to dishes while providing several essential nutrients. When using tomatillos in cooking, it’s best to choose fresh, firm fruits without any signs of mold or damage. Additionally, be mindful of added ingredients (like salt or oil) that can influence the overall nutritional profile of the dish.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a popular fruit, commonly used as a vegetable in cooking. They are rich in various essential nutrients and provide numerous health benefits. Here is the approximate nutritional profile of one medium-sized tomato (about 123 grams):

  • Calories: 22
  • Carbohydrates: 4.8 grams
  • Fiber: 1.5 grams
  • Sugars: 2.6 grams
  • Protein: 1.1 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin C: 15.6 mg (about 26% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin A: 1025 IU (about 21% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Potassium: 292 mg (about 8% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin K: 9.7 mcg (about 12% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 15.6 mcg (about 4% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Lycopene: Approximately 3025 mcg

Tomatoes are a great source of antioxidants, especially lycopene, which gives them a vibrant red color. Lycopene is known for its potential role in reducing the risk of certain cancers and promoting heart health. The presence of vitamin C also supports the immune system and skin health, while vitamin A is essential for vision and overall growth.

Moreover, tomatoes are low in calories and carbohydrates, making them a suitable option for those on a weight management plan or seeking to control their blood sugar levels.

Including tomatoes in your diet can be a healthy choice, whether consumed fresh in salads, cooked in sauces, or as part of various dishes. Remember that the nutritional values mentioned above are approximate and may vary slightly depending on the tomato’s size and variety.

Turnips

Turnips

Turnips are root vegetables that belong to the Brassicaceae family. They are known for their white or purple-colored flesh and have a slightly peppery taste. Here is the approximate nutritional profile of one medium-sized turnip (about 122 grams):

  • Calories: 34
  • Carbohydrates: 7.8 grams
  • Fiber: 2.2 grams
  • Sugars: 4.1 grams
  • Protein: 1.1 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Vitamin C: 19.4 mg (about 32% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin K: 2.3 mcg (about 29% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 19.4 mcg (about 5% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Potassium: 239 mg (about 7% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Calcium: 31.2 mg (about 3% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Magnesium: 18.6 mg (about 5% of the daily recommended intake)

Turnips are low in calories and provide a good amount of dietary fiber, which is beneficial for digestion and can help with weight management. They are also a great source of vitamin C, which supports the immune system and acts as an antioxidant, protecting the body from harmful free radicals.

Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting and bone health, and turnips offer a significant amount of this nutrient. Additionally, they contain some folate, which is important for cell division and is especially crucial during pregnancy.

Potassium in turnips helps maintain proper heart and muscle function, while calcium and magnesium contribute to bone health and various bodily processes.

Turnips can be consumed in various ways, such as roasted, boiled, mashed, or used in stews and soups. They are a nutritious addition to your diet and can be a versatile ingredient in different recipes. As with other vegetables, the nutritional values mentioned above are approximate and may vary slightly depending on the size and variety of the turnip.

Water Chestnuts

Water Chestnuts

Water chestnuts are aquatic vegetables known for their crunchy texture and slightly sweet flavor. They are commonly used in Asian cuisine and are often found in dishes like stir-fries, salads, and soups. Here is the approximate nutritional profile of 100 grams of raw water chestnuts:

  • Calories: 74
  • Carbohydrates: 17.9 grams
  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Sugars: 4 grams
  • Protein: 1.4 grams
  • Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Vitamin B6: 0.2 mg (about 12% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Potassium: 584 mg (about 12% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Copper: 0.2 mg (about 10% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Manganese: 0.2 mg (about 10% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): 0.1 mg (about 7% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 76 mcg (about 19% of the daily recommended intake)

Water chestnuts are low in calories and fat while providing a good amount of carbohydrates, making them a good energy source. They are notably rich in dietary fiber, which aids in digestion and helps maintain a healthy digestive system.

These aquatic vegetables are also a good source of several essential minerals like potassium, copper, and manganese. Potassium is essential for maintaining proper heart and muscle function, while copper and manganese play crucial roles in various enzymatic reactions and antioxidant defenses.

Water chestnuts provide significant amounts of vitamin B6 and folate. Vitamin B6 is important for brain development and function, as well as for the metabolism of protein and carbohydrates. Folate, on the other hand, is crucial for cell division and is particularly important during pregnancy to prevent neural tube defects in the developing fetus.

As water chestnuts are often consumed raw or minimally processed, they retain their nutrients well. Incorporating water chestnuts into your meals can add a delightful crunch and nutritional boost to your diet. Keep in mind that the nutritional values mentioned above are approximate and may vary slightly depending on the specific type and preparation of water chestnuts.

Yam

Yam

Yams are nutritious starchy root vegetables that belong to the Dioscoreaceae family. They are often confused with sweet potatoes, but they are botanically different. Yams have rough, scaly, and darker skin compared to smoother and lighter-colored sweet potatoes. Here is the approximate nutritional profile of 100 grams of raw yams:

  • Calories: 118
  • Carbohydrates: 27.9 grams
  • Fiber: 4.1 grams
  • Sugars: 0.5 grams
  • Protein: 1.5 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Vitamin C: 17.1 mg (about 29% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.3 mg (about 16% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Potassium: 816 mg (about 22% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Manganese: 0.4 mg (about 19% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): 0.1 mg (about 10% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Copper: 0.2 mg (about 10% of the daily recommended intake)

Yams are a good source of complex carbohydrates, making them a great energy source and providing a feeling of fullness. They also offer a decent amount of dietary fiber, which supports healthy digestion and can aid in weight management.

Yams are rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant that boosts the immune system, promotes healthy skin, and helps in the absorption of iron from plant-based foods. The presence of vitamin B6 is essential for brain development, immune function, and metabolism.

Yams are notably high in potassium, a mineral crucial for maintaining proper heart function, muscle contractions, and nerve signaling. They also provide manganese, which is involved in various enzymatic reactions and supports bone health.

Additionally, yams contain small amounts of other essential vitamins and minerals like thiamin (Vitamin B1) and copper, which are essential for energy production and various enzymatic processes in the body.

Yams can be prepared in various ways, including boiling, baking, roasting, or mashing, and they make a delicious and nutritious addition to a balanced diet. Please note that the nutritional values mentioned above are approximate and may vary slightly depending on the variety and preparation of the yams.

Zucchini

Zucchini

Zucchini, also known as courgette, is a popular summer squash with a mild flavor and tender texture. It is a versatile vegetable used in various dishes, such as salads, stir-fries, soups, and even as a substitute for pasta in “zoodles.” Here is the approximate nutritional profile of 100 grams of raw zucchini:

  • Calories: 17
  • Carbohydrates: 3.1 grams
  • Fiber: 1 gram
  • Sugars: 2.5 grams
  • Protein: 1.2 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams
  • Vitamin C: 17.9 mg (about 30% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.2 mg (about 10% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 24 mcg (about 6% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Vitamin K: 4.3 mcg (about 5% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Potassium: 261 mg (about 7% of the daily recommended intake)
  • Manganese: 0.2 mg (about 9% of the daily recommended intake)

Zucchini is low in calories and carbohydrates, making it a suitable option for those following a calorie-conscious or low-carb diet. It is a good source of dietary fiber, which supports healthy digestion and helps maintain bowel regularity.

The vegetable is rich in vitamin C, an essential antioxidant that boosts the immune system, promotes healthy skin, and aids in the absorption of iron from plant-based foods. It also provides a decent amount of vitamin B6, which is important for brain development, immune function, and metabolism.

Zucchini contains folate, a B vitamin necessary for cell division and important during pregnancy for fetal development. It also offers some vitamin K, which plays a crucial role in blood clotting and bone health.

Additionally, zucchini is a good source of potassium, a mineral that helps regulate blood pressure, heart rhythm, and muscle contractions. It also provides manganese, which supports various enzymatic reactions and contributes to bone health.

One of the great benefits of zucchini is its versatility and low calorie content, making it an excellent choice for weight management and healthy eating.

As with other vegetables, the nutritional values mentioned above are approximate and may vary slightly depending on the size and variety of the zucchini. When cooked, the nutrient content may also be affected, so it’s best to use cooking methods that retain as many nutrients as possible, such as steaming or sautéing.

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