List Of Dried Beans And Their Nutritional Value

List Of Dried Beans

Dried beans are a type of legume that has had their moisture removed through a drying process. They are versatile and nutrient-dense food that can be used in a variety of dishes, from soups and stews to salads and side dishes.

Here are some of the benefits of using dried beans in your diet:

Nutrient-dense: Dried beans are high in protein, fiber, complex carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals, including folate, iron, magnesium, and potassium.

Versatile: Dried beans can be used in a wide range of dishes, including chili, hummus, salads, casseroles, and more.

Affordable: Dried beans are often more affordable than canned beans, and they can be purchased in bulk for even greater savings.

Long shelf life: Dried beans have a long shelf life when stored in a cool, dry place, making them a convenient pantry staple.

Lower in sodium: Canned beans are often high in sodium, but dried beans can be cooked without added salt, allowing you to control the sodium content of your dishes.

When using dried beans, it is important to soak them overnight and cook them thoroughly to ensure that they are safe to eat and to improve their digestibility. Dried beans can take longer to cook than canned beans, but they are worth the extra effort for their flavor, texture, and nutritional benefits.

List Of Dried Beans

  1. Black beans
  2. Pinto beans
  3. Navy beans
  4. Kidney beans
  5. Lima beans
  6. Garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
  7. Lentils
  8. Cannellini beans
  9. Great Northern beans
  10. Red beans
  11. Adzuki beans
  12. Black-eyed peas
  13. Fava beans
  14. Mung beans
  15. Soybeans

These beans can be used in a variety of dishes, including soups, stews, salads, and side dishes. They are a good source of protein, fiber, and other essential nutrients, and can be a healthy addition to a balanced diet. When using dried beans, it is important to soak them overnight and cook them thoroughly to ensure that they are safe to eat and to improve their digestibility.

Black Beans Nutrition

Black beans are a nutrient-dense food that provides a range of important vitamins, minerals, and other beneficial compounds. Here is an overview of the nutrition profile of black beans:

Protein: A 1-cup serving of cooked black beans contains about 15 grams of protein, making them a good source of plant-based protein.

Fiber: Black beans are high in dietary fiber, with 1 cup of cooked black beans containing about 15 grams of fiber. This fiber can help promote digestive health and may help lower cholesterol levels.

Carbohydrates: Black beans are a good source of complex carbohydrates, with 1 cup of cooked black beans containing about 40 grams of carbs.

Fat: Black beans are relatively low in fat, with 1 cup of cooked black beans containing about 1 gram of fat.

Vitamins and minerals: Black beans are a good source of several vitamins and minerals, including folate, iron, magnesium, and potassium.

Antioxidants: Black beans contain a range of beneficial compounds, including flavonoids and other antioxidants, that may help protect against chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

Overall, black beans are a nutritious and versatile food that can be incorporated into a range of dishes, from soups and stews to salads and tacos. They are a good source of protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and may offer a range of health benefits when consumed as part of a balanced diet.

Pinto Beans Nutrition

Pinto beans are a nutritious legume that provides a range of important vitamins, minerals, and other beneficial compounds. Here is an overview of the nutrition profile of pinto beans:

Protein: A 1-cup serving of cooked pinto beans contains about 15 grams of protein, making them a good source of plant-based protein.

Fiber: Pinto beans are high in dietary fiber, with 1 cup of cooked pinto beans containing about 15 grams of fiber. This fiber can help promote digestive health and may help lower cholesterol levels.

Carbohydrates: Pinto beans are a good source of complex carbohydrates, with 1 cup of cooked pinto beans containing about 45 grams of carbs.

Fat: Pinto beans are relatively low in fat, with 1 cup of cooked pinto beans containing about 1 gram of fat.

Vitamins and minerals: Pinto beans are a good source of several vitamins and minerals, including folate, iron, magnesium, and potassium.

Antioxidants: Pinto beans contain a range of beneficial compounds, including flavonoids and other antioxidants, that may help protect against chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

Overall, pinto beans are a nutritious and versatile food that can be incorporated into a range of dishes, from soups and stews to salads and tacos. They are a good source of protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and may offer a range of health benefits when consumed as part of a balanced diet.

Navy Beans Nutrition

Navy beans, also known as white beans, are a nutrient-dense legume that provides a range of important vitamins, minerals, and other beneficial compounds. Here is an overview of the nutrition profile of navy beans:

Protein: A 1-cup serving of cooked navy beans contains about 15 grams of protein, making them a good source of plant-based protein.

Fiber: Navy beans are high in dietary fiber, with 1 cup of cooked navy beans containing about 19 grams of fiber. This fiber can help promote digestive health and may help lower cholesterol levels.

Carbohydrates: Navy beans are a good source of complex carbohydrates, with 1 cup of cooked navy beans containing about 47 grams of carbs.

Fat: Navy beans are relatively low in fat, with 1 cup of cooked navy beans containing about 1 gram of fat.

Vitamins and minerals: Navy beans are a good source of several vitamins and minerals, including folate, iron, magnesium, and potassium.

Antioxidants: Navy beans contain a range of beneficial compounds, including flavonoids and other antioxidants, that may help protect against chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

Overall, navy beans are a nutritious and versatile food that can be incorporated into a range of dishes, from soups and stews to salads and casseroles. They are a good source of protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and may offer a range of health benefits when consumed as part of a balanced diet.

Kidney beans Nutrition

Kidney beans, scientifically known as Phaseolus vulgaris, are a type of legume that is widely consumed worldwide. They are an excellent source of nutrients and provide numerous health benefits. Here is the approximate nutritional composition of cooked kidney beans per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 127 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 22.8 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 6.4 grams
  • Sugars: 0.3 grams
  • Protein: 8.7 grams
  • Fat: 0.5 grams
  • Saturated fat: 0.1 grams
  • Monounsaturated fat: 0.1 grams
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 0.2 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin C: 1.8 mg
  • Vitamin K: 8.9 mcg
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 38 mcg
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): 0.2 mg
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): 0.1 mg
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): 0.5 mg
  • Vitamin B6: 0.1 mg
  • Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5): 0.3 mg

Minerals

  • Potassium: 358 mg
  • Phosphorus: 139 mg
  • Magnesium: 40 mg
  • Calcium: 24 mg
  • Iron: 2.9 mg
  • Zinc: 1.0 mg
  • Manganese: 0.2 mg
  • Copper: 0.3 mg
  • Sodium: 1 mg

Other nutrients

  • Choline: 8.5 mg
  • Betaine: 67.1 mg

It’s important to note that these values are approximate and can vary depending on the specific variety of kidney beans and how they are prepared. Also, keep in mind that the nutritional content may change if you cook the beans with added ingredients like oil, salt, or other seasonings.

Kidney beans are an excellent source of plant-based protein and dietary fiber, making them a great option for vegetarians, vegans, and anyone looking to increase their fiber intake. Additionally, they provide essential vitamins and minerals that support overall health, including potassium, iron, and folate.

However, it’s important to prepare kidney beans properly, as they contain certain toxins that can be harmful if not cooked thoroughly. To ensure their safety, it is recommended to soak dried kidney beans overnight before cooking and then boil them for at least 10 minutes to neutralize the toxins. Alternatively, you can use canned kidney beans, which are pre-cooked and safe to consume.

Lima beans Nutrition

Lima beans, also known as butter beans, are another type of legume that offer a wide array of nutrients and health benefits. Here is the approximate nutritional composition of cooked lima beans per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 115 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 20.2 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 7 grams
  • Sugars: 1.4 grams
  • Protein: 7.8 grams
  • Fat: 0.4 grams
  • Saturated fat: 0.1 grams
  • Monounsaturated fat: 0.1 grams
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 0.2 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin C: 5.1 mg
  • Vitamin K: 0.7 mcg
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 25 mcg
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): 0.1 mg
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): 0.1 mg
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): 0.5 mg
  • Vitamin B6: 0.2 mg
  • Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5): 0.3 mg

Minerals

  • Potassium: 436 mg
  • Phosphorus: 63 mg
  • Magnesium: 24 mg
  • Calcium: 13 mg
  • Iron: 1.8 mg
  • Zinc: 0.5 mg
  • Manganese: 0.2 mg
  • Copper: 0.1 mg
  • Sodium: 2 mg

Other nutrients

  • Choline: 16.1 mg
  • Betaine: 0.1 mg

As with other legumes, lima beans are a good source of plant-based protein and dietary fiber, making them beneficial for digestive health and maintaining a balanced diet. They also provide essential vitamins and minerals, including potassium, which supports heart health, and iron, which is important for oxygen transport in the body.

Like other legumes, lima beans should be properly cooked to ensure they are safe to eat and to improve their digestibility. If using dried lima beans, soak them overnight before cooking and boil them for at least 10 minutes to eliminate any potential toxins.

Keep in mind that the nutritional content of lima beans can vary slightly depending on the variety and how they are prepared. Additionally, canned lima beans are available as a convenient and pre-cooked option, but they may contain added sodium, so be sure to check the label if you’re watching your sodium intake.

Garbanzo beans Nutrition

Garbanzo beans, also known as chickpeas, are a popular legume with a rich nutritional profile. They are a great source of various essential nutrients, making them a healthy addition to any diet. Here’s a breakdown of the nutrition in a one-cup (164g) serving of cooked garbanzo beans:

  • Calories: 269 kcal
  • Protein: 14.5 grams
  • Carbohydrates: 45 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: 12.5 grams
  • Sugars: 8 grams
  • Fat: 4.2 grams
  • Saturated Fat: 0.4 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 1.1 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 1.6 grams
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acids: 44.2 mg
  • Omega-6 Fatty Acids: 1529 mg

Vitamins

  • Vitamin A: 55 IU
  • Vitamin C: 4.7 mg
  • Vitamin K: 10.6 mcg
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): 0.1 mg
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): 0.1 mg
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): 0.5 mg
  • Vitamin B6: 0.3 mg
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 282 mcg
  • Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5): 0.5 mg

Minerals

  • Calcium: 80 mg
  • Iron: 4.7 mg
  • Magnesium: 78 mg
  • Phosphorus: 276 mg
  • Potassium: 291 mg
  • Zinc: 2.5 mg
  • Copper: 0.6 mg
  • Manganese: 1.1 mg
  • Selenium: 6.9 mcg

Other

  • Choline: 46.5 mg
  • Betaine: 179 mg

Garbanzo beans are particularly valued for their high protein and fiber content, which can help with satiety and digestive health. Additionally, they are an excellent source of folate, essential for DNA synthesis and cell division, and various minerals like iron, which is crucial for transporting oxygen in the blood. Chickpeas are also known for being rich in antioxidants, such as flavonoids and polyphenols, which have numerous health benefits.

Including garbanzo beans in your diet can contribute to better overall health, as they provide a range of essential nutrients and are a great option for vegans and vegetarians looking to boost their protein intake. They can be used in a variety of dishes, including salads, soups, stews, and hummus.

Lentils Nutrition

Lentils are a highly nutritious legume that provides a wide array of essential nutrients. They are a staple in many cuisines around the world and are commonly used in soups, stews, salads, and various other dishes. Here’s a breakdown of the key nutritional components of lentils:

Protein: Lentils are an excellent source of plant-based protein. They contain about 25-30% protein by weight, making them a valuable protein source for vegetarians and vegans.

Carbohydrates: Lentils are rich in complex carbohydrates, including dietary fiber. The fiber content in lentils is beneficial for digestive health and helps stabilize blood sugar levels.

Fiber: Lentils are a great source of dietary fiber, providing both soluble and insoluble fiber. This fiber content aids in promoting bowel regularity, lowering cholesterol levels, and maintaining a healthy gut.

Vitamins: Lentils are rich in various vitamins, including folate (vitamin B9), thiamin (vitamin B1), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), and vitamin B6. Folate is especially important for pregnant women as it supports proper fetal development.

Minerals: Lentils are a good source of essential minerals such as iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and phosphorus. Iron is crucial for the production of red blood cells and preventing anemia.

Low in Fat: Lentils are low in fat, particularly saturated fat, making them a heart-healthy food option.

Antioxidants: Lentils contain various antioxidants, including polyphenols and flavonoids, which help protect cells from oxidative damage.

Low Glycemic Index: Lentils have a low glycemic index, meaning they cause a slow and gradual rise in blood sugar levels, making them a suitable food choice for individuals with diabetes.

The exact nutritional profile of lentils can vary slightly based on the specific variety and cooking method. Generally, they are a nutrient-dense food that can provide numerous health benefits when incorporated into a balanced diet. Lentils are an excellent source of protein, especially for those following plant-based diets, and they can play a vital role in supporting overall health and well-being.

Cannellini Beans Nutrition

Cannellini beans, also known as white kidney beans, are a type of legume that is popular in Italian cuisine. They are widely available and can be used in a variety of dishes, from soups and stews to salads and dips. Here is the approximate nutritional information for 1 cup (about 177 grams) of cooked cannellini beans:

  • Calories: 226 kcal
  • Protein: 15.35 grams
  • Carbohydrates: 40.4 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: 11.0 grams
  • Sugars: 0.3 grams
  • Fat: 0.9 grams
  • Saturated Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.4 grams
  • Sodium: 6 milligrams
  • Potassium: 561 milligrams
  • Calcium: 79 milligrams
  • Iron: 4.2 milligrams
  • Magnesium: 74 milligrams
  • Phosphorus: 208 milligrams
  • Zinc: 1.3 milligrams

Cannellini beans are a good source of protein, fiber, and several essential minerals such as iron, magnesium, and phosphorus. They are also low in fat and calories, making them a nutritious addition to a balanced diet. Their high fiber content helps with digestion and can contribute to a feeling of fullness, making them a great option for those looking to manage their weight or improve their digestive health.

As with any food, portion control is essential, especially if you are watching your caloric intake or have specific dietary needs. Enjoying cannellini beans as part of a varied and well-balanced diet can provide numerous health benefits and add delicious flavor and texture to your meals.

Great Northern Beans Nutrition

Great Northern beans are another type of white bean that is similar to cannellini beans in appearance and taste. They are a popular ingredient in various dishes and have a slightly nutty flavor. Here is the approximate nutritional information for 1 cup (about 177 grams) of cooked Great Northern beans:

  • Calories: 209 kcal
  • Protein: 14.7 grams
  • Carbohydrates: 37.6 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: 12.4 grams
  • Sugars: 0.6 grams
  • Fat: 0.8 grams
  • Saturated Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.4 grams
  • Sodium: 1 milligram
  • Potassium: 561 milligrams
  • Calcium: 120 milligrams
  • Iron: 4.3 milligrams
  • Magnesium: 107 milligrams
  • Phosphorus: 248 milligrams
  • Zinc: 1.4 milligrams

Like cannellini beans, Great Northern beans are an excellent source of protein, fiber, and essential minerals such as iron, magnesium, and phosphorus. They are low in fat and calories, making them a healthy addition to various dishes.

The high fiber content of Great Northern beans can aid in digestion, support heart health, and help regulate blood sugar levels. They also provide a good amount of plant-based protein, making them a valuable option for vegetarians and vegans.

When cooking Great Northern beans, it’s important to soak them overnight before cooking to reduce cooking time and improve their digestibility. This is a common practice for most dried beans and legumes.

As with any food, moderation, and variety are key to maintaining a balanced and healthy diet. Incorporate Great Northern beans into your meals alongside other nutritious foods for a diverse and well-rounded nutrition intake.

Red Beans Nutrition

Red beans, also known as kidney beans, are a popular type of legume that is widely consumed around the world. They are rich in various nutrients and can be a beneficial addition to a balanced diet. Here is the approximate nutrition information for one cup (177 grams) of cooked red beans:

  • Calories: 225 kcal
  • Protein: 15 grams
  • Carbohydrates: 40 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: 13 grams
  • Sugars: 0.3 grams
  • Fat: 1 gram
  • Saturated Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.5 grams
  • Cholesterol: 0 grams
  • Sodium: 1 milligram
  • Potassium: 607 milligrams
  • Calcium: 40 milligrams
  • Iron: 4 milligrams
  • Magnesium: 38 milligrams
  • Phosphorus: 77 milligrams
  • Zinc: 1 milligram
  • Copper: 0.4 milligrams
  • Manganese: 0.4 milligrams
  • Vitamin C: 4 milligrams
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 230 micrograms

Red beans are an excellent source of plant-based protein, dietary fiber, and essential minerals like iron, potassium, and magnesium. They are low in fat and have no cholesterol, making them heart-friendly. The high fiber content aids in digestion and helps maintain a healthy digestive system. Additionally, they provide a good amount of folate, which is crucial for pregnant women and essential for cell division and DNA synthesis.

While red beans are nutritious, it’s essential to remember that they contain a compound called phytohemagglutinin, which is mildly toxic if not properly cooked. Cooking beans thoroughly helps neutralize this compound, so it’s vital to soak the beans overnight and then cook them properly before consumption.

Overall, red beans are a fantastic addition to a well-balanced diet, providing an array of essential nutrients and health benefits. They can be used in various recipes, including soups, salads, and stews, and as a filling for burritos or tacos.

Adzuki Beans Nutrition

Adzuki beans, also known as azuki beans or aduki beans, are small red beans that are popular in East Asian cuisine. They are a good source of various nutrients and offer several health benefits. Here is the approximate nutrition profile of cooked adzuki beans per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 128 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 25.2 g
  • Dietary fiber: 7.3 g
  • Sugars: 0.2 g
  • Protein: 7.5 g
  • Fat: 0.2 g
  • Saturated fat: 0.1 g
  • Monounsaturated fat: 0.0 g
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 0.1 g

Vitamins

  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): 0.2 mg
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): 0.1 mg
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): 1.1 mg
  • Vitamin B6: 0.2 mg
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 122 mcg

Minerals

  • Potassium: 429 mg
  • Phosphorus: 150 mg
  • Magnesium: 47 mg
  • Iron: 1.3 mg
  • Zinc: 1.0 mg
  • Copper: 0.3 mg
  • Manganese: 0.4 mg

Black-eyed Peas Nutrition

Black-eyed peas, also known as cowpeas or black-eyed beans, are a popular legume with several nutritional benefits. Below are the approximate nutrition facts per 100 grams of cooked black-eyed peas:

  • Calories: 120 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 21.5 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: 7.5 grams
  • Sugars: 3.3 grams
  • Protein: 8.3 grams
  • Fat: 0.4 grams
  • Saturated Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 0.1 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.2 grams

Vitamins and Minerals

  • Vitamin A: 19 IU
  • Vitamin C: 1.2 mg
  • Vitamin K: 2.8 µg
  • Folate: 208 µg
  • Iron: 1.2 mg
  • Magnesium: 45 mg
  • Phosphorus: 150 mg
  • Potassium: 303 mg
  • Zinc: 1.1 mg

Black-eyed peas are a good source of complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and plant-based protein. They are also rich in various essential vitamins and minerals, especially folate, which is crucial for cell division and proper fetal development during pregnancy. Additionally, black-eyed peas contain significant amounts of iron, magnesium, and potassium, which are vital for maintaining healthy blood, muscles, and nerve function.

These legumes are naturally low in fat and calories, making them a nutritious addition to various meals, including salads, soups, stews, and side dishes. They also provide a good amount of antioxidants and phytonutrients that contribute to overall health and well-being.

As with any food, moderation is key, and it’s essential to balance black-eyed peas with other nutritious foods to create a well-rounded diet. If you have specific dietary concerns or conditions, it’s always a good idea to consult with a registered dietitian or healthcare professional for personalized advice.

Fava Beans Nutrition

Fava beans, also known as broad beans, are a nutritious legume with a wealth of health benefits. They are a good source of various essential nutrients and have been part of traditional diets in many cultures for centuries. Here is an overview of the nutritional content of fava beans per 100 grams of cooked beans:

  • Calories: Approximately 88 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: About 16 grams
  • Dietary Fiber: Roughly 6 grams
  • Sugars: Around 0.8 grams
  • Protein: Approximately 5.9 grams
  • Fat: About 0.6 grams
  • Saturated Fat: Approximately 0.2 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fat: About 0.1 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: Around 0.2 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin K: Rich source
  • Vitamin B1 (Thiamin): Good amount
  • Vitamin B6: Adequate amount
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): High content (good for pregnant women)

Minerals

  • Iron: About 1.8 mg (good for vegetarians and vegans)
  • Manganese: Rich source
  • Phosphorus: About 106 mg
  • Copper: Around 0.2 mg
  • Magnesium: About 33 mg
  • Potassium: Roughly 421 mg
  • Antioxidants: Fava beans are a good source of various antioxidants, including flavonoids and polyphenols, which help protect the body from oxidative stress and inflammation.
  • L-dopa: Fava beans contain L-dopa, a precursor to dopamine, which is important for brain function.

The nutritional content of fava beans makes them a valuable addition to a balanced diet. They are a great source of plant-based protein, which can be beneficial for vegetarians and vegans. Additionally, their high fiber content aids in digestion and promotes a feeling of fullness, making them useful for weight management.

However, it’s important to note that some individuals may be sensitive to fava beans, and in rare cases, consumption can lead to a condition called “favism,” which is a genetic disorder where eating fava beans can cause hemolytic anemia. If you have concerns about fava beans or any other food, it’s best to consult with a healthcare professional or a registered dietitian.

Mung Beans Nutrition

Mung beans, also known as green gram or mung dal, are a type of legume that belongs to the Fabaceae family. They are widely consumed in various cuisines around the world and are well-regarded for their nutritional benefits. Here is the approximate nutritional composition of cooked mung beans per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 105 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 18.3 grams
  • Dietary fiber: 7.6 grams
  • Sugars: 2.6 grams
  • Protein: 7.1 grams
  • Fat: 0.4 grams
  • Saturated fat: 0.1 grams
  • Monounsaturated fat: 0.1 grams
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 0.1 grams

Vitamins

  • Vitamin C: 13.2 mg (22% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Vitamin K: 6.8 mcg (8% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Folate (Vitamin B9): 16.5 mcg (4% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Vitamin B6: 0.1 mg (3% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Niacin (Vitamin B3): 0.5 mg (3% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2): 0.1 mg (3% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1): 0.1 mg (3% of the recommended daily intake)

Minerals

  • Manganese: 0.2 mg (9% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Phosphorus: 49 mg (5% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Iron: 0.6 mg (4% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Magnesium: 21 mg (5% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Potassium: 149 mg (4% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Copper: 0.1 mg (3% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Zinc: 0.2 mg (2% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Calcium: 27 mg (3% of the recommended daily intake)
  • Selenium: 2.5 mcg (4% of the recommended daily intake)

Mung beans are an excellent source of plant-based protein, fiber, and essential vitamins and minerals. They are low in fat and have a relatively low glycemic index, making them a good choice for individuals with diabetes or those looking to manage their blood sugar levels.

In addition to these nutrients, mung beans also contain various bioactive compounds like antioxidants and phytochemicals, which have been associated with potential health benefits, such as reducing oxidative stress and inflammation.

Including mung beans in your diet can be a great way to add valuable nutrients to your meals, whether in salads, soups, stews, or other dishes.

Soybeans Nutrition

Soybeans are a highly nutritious legume that has been a staple food in many cultures for thousands of years. They are an excellent source of various essential nutrients and can be consumed in various forms, including whole, soy milk, tofu, tempeh, soy sauce, and more. Here are some key nutritional aspects of soybeans:

Protein: Soybeans are one of the best plant-based sources of protein. They contain all the essential amino acids required by the human body, making them a complete protein source. This makes soybeans particularly valuable for vegans, vegetarians, and those looking to reduce their consumption of animal products.

Healthy Fats: Soybeans are rich in polyunsaturated fats, particularly omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. These fats are essential for heart health and play a vital role in various bodily functions.

Carbohydrates: Soybeans contain complex carbohydrates that provide a steady source of energy. They have a low glycemic index, which means they do not cause rapid spikes in blood sugar levels.

Dietary Fiber: Soybeans are an excellent source of dietary fiber, promoting digestive health and helping to prevent constipation. Fiber also contributes to a feeling of fullness and may aid in weight management.

Vitamins: Soybeans are a good source of several vitamins, including folate (essential for DNA synthesis and cell division), vitamin K (important for blood clotting and bone health), vitamin C (an antioxidant that supports the immune system), and various B vitamins that help with energy production.

Minerals: Soybeans are rich in minerals such as iron (important for oxygen transport in the blood), calcium (crucial for bone health), magnesium (essential for muscle function and nerve transmission), and potassium (important for heart health and fluid balance).

Isoflavones: Soybeans contain naturally occurring compounds called isoflavones, which have antioxidant properties and may have potential health benefits. Isoflavones, such as genistein and daidzein, are phytoestrogens that can mimic the effects of estrogen in the body. Some research suggests that isoflavones may help reduce the risk of certain chronic diseases, including heart disease and certain types of cancers.

It’s essential to note that while soybeans are highly nutritious, some people may have allergies or sensitivities to soy products. If you have any concerns about incorporating soy into your diet, it’s best to consult a healthcare professional or registered dietitian for personalized advice.

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